ALL ABOUT
TUNBRIDGE WELLS

Page 4

 

A HISTORY OF 60 GROSVENOR ROAD

Written By: Edward James Gilbert-Thunder Bay, Ontario, Canada

Date: January 12,2017

BACKGROUND

My interest is 60 Grosvenor Road was prompted by the research and article I wrote about the carriage and motor body builders Rock, Thorpe & Chatfield several years ago and more recently my article entitled ‘The 1915 Fire on Grosvenor Road’ dated January 8,2017, for during a search for images of their building at 62 Grosvenor Road I became interested in a partial view of another building on the same side of the road occupied by Reading Brothers who were cycle manufacturers.

What became obvious during my research is that significant changes to the street scene have occurred circa 1839 to the present time that in part pertain to the site of 60 Grosvenor Road. The early history of the north end of Grosvenor Road ,where it intersects with Mount Ephraim ,is a fascinating one, which in a later section I provide some brief information about. What began as a predominantly sparsely populated residential area became the site of a northward movement of one of the towns commercial districts, resulting in the loss of many old buildings.

Today the site of 58 and 60 Grosvenor Road is that of the Divizia Italian restaurant and due to a renumbering of the road in the 20th century now has the address of No. 84-86.  The building they occupy was built in the late 19th century and although altered in some respects still appears in overall form much as it did when constructed of red brick.This three sty building with shop frontage at street level is of an interesting architectural style but compared to other buildings of the same era is more modest in its treatment of ornamental brick and stone work.

EVOLUTION OF THE SITE

A map of 1738 shows that on the east side of Grosvenor Road, where it intersects with Mount Ephraim, there was a large residence, the property of Mr Brett, who owned at that time many properties in the town, most notably several in Mount Sion. It is believed by the researcher that Mr Bretts residence at this location was on large grounds and that when demolished became the future site of the residential and commercial buildings near that intersection. Across the road, on the spot now occupied by the United Reform Church, which was built of red brick in 1889 to the design of architect Herbert Murkin Caley as St John’s Free Baptist Church there appears on the 1738 map a building called “The Crown” which most likely was a public house, and is labelled as the property of a Mr Jarrett.

Of particular interest from a map of 1808 is that a Mrs Langridge was the proprietor of a lodging house on the south east corner of Grosvenor Road and a lane (later to become Grosvenor Park) which was later demolished and became the future site of 60 Grosvenor Road. This map also shows a building on the north east corner of this intersection which was later demolished and which in 1893 became the site of the carriage and motor car works of Rock, Thorpe & Chatfield at No. 62 Grosvenor Road. This area appears exactly the same on a 1828 map.

The 1832 map  records that the building constructed on the future site of No. 60 was called Grosvenor House and that is was situated on large grounds that extended for some considerable distance south from the future Grosvenor Park as well as eastward. Grosvenor House was still there on a 1843 map.

The 1849 map by Gisborne provides a more detailed view of the occupancy of the land near the intersection of Mount Ephraim and Grosvenor Road. At that time the site of the future No. 60 was occupied by what still appears to be Grosvenor House.

A map of 1872 shows that Grosvenor House is gone; that new buildings have been constructed northward up to an area south of the Grosvenor House land and that the rest of the land on which No. 60 was built was vacant land. The old building on the north east corner of Grosvenor Road and Grosvenor Park is still  there but in 1893 it was demolished to make way for the construction of the impressive multi-sty brick works building of Rock, Thorpe & Chatfield.

When exactly the block of buildings, including the building of 58-60 Grosvenor Road was built on this aforementioned vacant plot of land is not known but a safe estimate is circa 1890.

LOCATION AND DESCRIPTION

Among the buildings on Grosvenor Road extending south from Grosvenor Park was initially a building consisting of two shops on the main floor (No. 58-60) with two stys above for residential and perhaps office use. The building was constructed of red brick with some nice stone work along the roof line. Although not as ornate as the building of Rock, Thorpe and Chatfieldm, built in 1893, it was not what one would call ‘plain’.

Shown opposite is a postcard view of the intersection of Grosvenor Road and Mount Ephraim looking south. In this image one can see in the middle a view of St John’s Free Baptist Church (built 1889) as well as a drinking fountain named “The General Thomas Molyneux Williams Drinking Fountain. Details about this fountain were given in my article ‘Monuments and Memorials of Tunbridge Wells’ dated October 12,2002  within which I noted that the fountain was installed in 1871 upon the death of Liet. General Thomas Molyneux Williams K.H. (1793-1871), a relative of the Hon F.G. Molyneux of Earl’s Court fame.  In the foreground of this image on the left side is the impressive building of Rock, Thorpe & Chatfield and just to the right of it on the other side of the road ‘Grosvenor Park’ is a partial view of the red brick building (No. 60) occupied at that time by cycle manufacturer William Watson. As you will read later in the section about the Watson family, William Watson had brothers who worked with him at these premises manufacturing cycles.

It is perhaps interesting to note that no listing for a No. 60 Grosvenor Road was found in directories prior to 1900 but there were some listings for Grosvenor Road for which no street address was given. The first confirmed occupancy of No. 60 was from the 1901 census  when William Watson was manufacturing cycles there.

THE WATSON FAMILY OF CYCLE MAKERS

Local directories of 1903,1913 and 1918 all listed the following “ William Watson, cycle manufacturer, 60 Grosvenor Road”. Also listed at No. 60 in the directories of 1913 and 1918 were “Reading Brothers, upholsterers, 60 Grosvenor Road & 18 Albion Road”.  A directory for 1899 gave “William Watson, cycle maker, 29a Grosvenor Road”. Shown opposite is the 1907 os map on which is highlighted by a red arrow the location of 60 Grosvenor Road. Behind it on Grosvenor Park is a second and most interesting little red brick building (formerly a chapel then a garage and now a residence). Details about the former chapel were given in a separate article.

The earliest census record of William Watson being in Tunbridge Wells is the 1901 census, taken at 60 Grosvenor Road where he is given as a cycle maker employing others in the business. With him was his wife Emeline, born 1867 in Colchester, Essex and their daughter Elizabeth, born 1888 in Colchester. No 1911 census for 60 Grosvenor Road was found but Mr Watson,based on directories up to and including 1918, was still the occupant of these premises.  The 1911 census for the shop next door at No. 58 gave Arthur Henry Jones, born 1886 Tunbridge Wells with the occupation of fishmonger. With him was his wife Rose, born 1886 in Norwich, Norfolk, and their son Fank, born 1910 in Tunbridge Wells. This couple had only been married for two years and just had the one child at that time.

In my account about the firm of Rock, Thorpe & Chatfield I noted that although Mr Chatfield retired in 1910 the company continued with his name until 1916 when the business was incorporated at Rock, Thorpe & Co. Ltd and that in 1922 when a Mr Watson joined the firm it as incorporated as Rock, Thorpe & Watson Co. Ltd and it was my opinion then as now that the Mr Watson of this company was William Watson the former cycle maker of 60 Grosvenor Road.

THE READING FAMILY OF UPHOLSTERS

Local directories for the years 1913 and 1918 gave (1) Reading Brothers, upholsterers, 60 Grosvenor Road and 18 Albion Road and (2) William Reading, cycle manufacturer, 60 Grosvenor Road. A 1903 directory gave two listings namely (1) William Watson, cycle manufacturer, 60 Grosvenor Road (2) William Watson 16 London Road, Southborough. Shown opposite is a 1913 photograph by local photographer James Richards which apart from showing a parade of women shown on he left in the foreground the Reading shop on which their sign can be seen.

I begin my account of the Reading family with the 1871 census, taken at Old Dover Road at Northfleet, Kent, where the head of the household was a married woman by the name of Mary Reading, a paper manufacturers wife, born 1832 at Dartford, Kent. Living with her were three daughters and four sons namely (2) George W, age 14, born at Sutton at Home, Kent, a scholar (2) Aaron E, age 10, born at Hurton Kirby, a scholar (3) Herbert Samuel, age 6, born 1865 at Dartford, Kent (4) William, age 3, born 1868 at Northfleet, Kent. Of these it was Herbert and William who became cycle makers.

The 1881 census, taken at 8 Albion Road, Tunbridge Wells, gave William Reading as the manager of a paper works who was born 1829 at Chilworth, Surrey, With him was his wife Mary and five children including Annie Whilehurst Reading, age 18; Mary Jane, age 17; Herbert Samue4l, age 16, a scholar; William, age 13, a scholar and Percy Archibald born in Tunbridge Wells in 1874. From this it is noted that the Reading family took up residence in Tunbridge Wells after 1868 and before 1874.

At the time of the 1891 census, Herbert Samuel Reading was living as a boarder at 170 Albany Road in London, where he was working as an upholsterers apprentice. His brother George W. Reading was also living there as a boarder and working as a jewellers apprentice.  The 1891 census, taken at 16 Albion Road, Tunbridge Wells gave William Reading age 60, a paper mill manager, along with his wife Mary and children Annie, a milliner worker; William, a cabinet maker and upholsterer and Percy as cabinet maker and upholsterer.  

The records of the Old Bailey record a trial on May 18,1896 in which charges were brought against Herbert Samuel Reading (born 1866) and Edward Ernest James, age 26, for the alleged crime of unlawfully conspiring to obtain credit and money by false pretences. Mr James pled guilty and was sentenced to five years in prison. No evidence was brought against Mr Reading and so was found not guilty.

The 1901 census, taken at 18 Albion Road, Tunbridge Wells gave Herbert Samuel Reading as a draper, weaver, designer. With him was his two spinster sisters Annie and Mary and younger brother Percy who was working as a tuner of pianos and an organist on own account.

Returning now to William Reading, he married Eliza Bovington (1871-1901)  April 1896  in Tunbridge Wells. The 1901 census, taken at 170 Albany Road, Tunbridge Wells gave William Reading as an upholsterer worker. With him was just his wife Eliza, born in Tunbridge Wells. Eliza died in Tunbridge Wells later on in 1901.

The 1911 census, taken at 18 Albion Road, Tunbridge Wells gave Mary Reading age 47 , single of no occupation. With her was her sister in law Maria, born 1864 in Dartford and Mary’s two brothers Herbert Samuel, an upholsterer and William, a carrier. The census recorded that the family were living in premises of 6 rooms.

Probate records gave William Reading of 20 Highfield Road, Dartford, Kent when he died March 3,1923. The executor of his 1,147 pound estate was his brother Herbert Samuel Reading, house furnisher.

Probate records for Herbert Samuel Reading gave him of Dunroaming, London Road, Brighton when he died February 26,1935. The executor of his 8,393 pound estate was the Public Trustee.

Percy Archibald Reading who at the time of the 1891 census was living  with his parents and two siblings at 16 Albion Road,Tunbridge Wells working as a cabinet maker, upholster, worker. In the 2nd qtr of 1904 he married Florence Clara Littlechild in Tunbridge Wells.

The 1911 census, taken at 12 Papillon Road, Colchester Essex, gave Percy as a musical trade worker. With him was his wife Florence Clara, who had been born 1880 in Tunbridge Wells, and their five year old son Archibald who had been born in West Norwood.

Directories of 1922 to 1938 gave “ Percy Archibald Reading, 50 Meadow Road, Southborough, piano tuner and repairer”.

Percy died in Tunbridge Wells in the 2nd qtr of 1939.

RECENT HISTORY 

No attempt was made to research the occupants of 60 Grosvenor Road beyond the time the premises were last occupied by the Reading Brothers.

Moving ahead in time to 2013 I noted that the old 58-60 Grosvenor Road (now 84-86) was an Italian restaurant by the name of ‘Palio Restaurante”. A photo from2013 of this restaurant is shown opposite. The proprietor of this restaurant was Rensp Palio and its manager was Riccardo Palio. They had 30 years  experience in their successful London Restaurant before coming to Tunbridge Wells.

By 2015 this restaurant became the “Divizia” Italian restaurant with an address of 84-86 Grosvenor Road.  The Kent & Sussex Courier of May 5,2016 reported that it had been closed for a period of two weeks while the kitchen was being refurbished. Angelo Mancosa, who owns it and has restaurants in Rochester and Gravesend. The business was founded in Turin Italy and the article stated he also had 80 restaurants in Italy.

In the photograph of the Divizia one can see the interesting little red brick building behind the restaurant. An earlier photograph of this little building showed it had a central passage door below the central arch top window and on both sides of the door the arch top windows visible in this photo except the window on the right side had been shortened to accommodate the installation of a garage door and the passage door was also removed. What this building was originally is a bit of a mystery but to the researcher has the appearance of originally being a small chapel. It appears on the 1907 os map given earlier in this article.

REV. GEORGE HAWTREY CAMBURN-A WESLAYAN MINISTER

Written By: Edward James Gilbert-Thunder Bay, Ontario

Date: May 18,2018

INTRODUCTION

The most notable member of the Camburn family, as it pertains to the history of Tunbridge Wells ,was Harold Hawtrey Camburn(1876-1956), the son of Rev. George Hawtrey Camburn (1844-1919).George Hawtrey Camburn was a Weslayan Minister who during part of his career served in the Tunbridge Wells circuit and who lived in Tunbridge Wells with his wife near the end of his life, and who died and was buried in Tunbridge Wells in 1919. George’s wife Hannah Read Camburn, nee Fowler (1848-1930) also died and was buried in Tunbridge Wells.

Harold Hawtrey Camburn is best known for his career in Tunbridge Wells of some 40 years as an accomplished and prolific photographer and printer/publisher of postcards. It is estimated that he produced some 10,000 postcards during his career, mostly of Kent and Sussex, but also of other counties in the south of England. His images were produced using the best available photographic equipment and materials and the best printing machines and are noted for both their high quality and a demonstration of Camburn’s skills as a photographer. Shown above is a self photograph of Camburn taken with a timer on his camera while on one of his photographic expeditions. Several examples of postcards by him in which an image of his motorcycle is shown were produced.

Details about Harold Hawtrey Camburn, his family and photographic career, were given in my article ‘ The Life and Times of Harold Camburn’ dated August 12,2011 (updated March 23,2018) and I have written about him and referred to him in various other articles, in which his postcard images have been featured. Although the aforementioned article provided some background about his parents, in this article I present a more in depth coverage of Rev. George Hawtrey Camburn, his parents and siblings and wife, and his career.

THE PARENTS AND SIBLINGS OF GEORGE HAWTREY CAMBURN

George Hawtrey Camburn was born in the 3rd qtr of 1844 at Elham, Kent. He was the eldest child of nine children born to George Alfred Camburn (1821-1882) and Amy Camburn, nee Buss, (1823-1897).

George Alfred Camburn had been born 1821 at Whitstable, Kent, one of seven children born to George Camburn (1769-1840) and Mary Camburn, nee Lawson (born 1775). His father George Camburn died in the 2nd qtr of 1840 at Blean, Kent.

On October 9,1843 George Alfred Camburn married Amy Buss (1823-1897) at Elham, Kent. He and his wife had the following children (1) George Hawtrey Camburn (1844-1919) (2) Hawtrey John Camburn (1846-1920) (3) Amy Lucas Camburn (born 1848) (4) Alfred James Camburn (1850-1929) (5) Martin Luther Camburn (1852-1942) (6) Florence Camburn (1854-1908) (7) Caleb Buss Camburn (1857-1943) (8) Albert Edward Camburn (1862-1900) (9) Madeline Hannah Camburn (1868-1933).

The 1851 census, taken at 13 High Street in Elham, Kent gave George Alfred Camburn  as the proprietor of the butchers shop. With him was his wife Amy and his children George Hawtrey Camburn, a scholar; Hawtrey John Camburn, a scholar; Amy Lucas Camburn and Alfred James Camburn. Also there was one journeyman butcher and one house servant. The family was still living in Elham in 1857.

The 1861 census, taken at Folkestone, Kent gave George Alfred Camburn as a master butcher employing one man and two boys and With him were his children Hawtrey John Camnburn, an assistant butcher working for his father; Alfred James Camburn, scholar; Martin Luther Camburn, scholar; Florence Camburn, scholar; Calebe Buss Camburn, scholar. Also there was one journeyman butcher; one assistant and one domestic servant.  In 1867 George Alfred Camburn was a master butcher at Rendezvous Street in Folkestone.

George Alfred Camburn was living and working in Elham at 39 High Street as a master butcher with his wife Amy and some of his children in the census records of 1871 to 1881. Probate records gave George Alfred Camburn late of 39 High Street, Elham, butcher, when he died August 2,1882 at 30 High Street. The executors of his 1,205 pound estate was his widow Amy Camburn of 39 High Street and his son George Hawtrey Camburn, Weslayan Minister.

Amy Camburn, nee Buss (1823-1897) was born in Lydd, Kent. The 1841 census, taken at St Mary, Kent, gave Amy living on her own, Details about her parents and siblings were not established and no definitive information about her was found prior to her marriage to George Alfred Camburn in 1843. When her husband passed away in 1882 she continued to live in Elham and died in Elham in the 1st qtr of 1897.

Given below is an overview for each of the children of George Alfred Camburn, except for Rev George Hawtrey Camburn, the central figure of this article, who’s life and career is expanded on in a later section of this article.

[1] HAWTREY JOHN CAMBURN (1846-1920)

Hawtrey was born in the 2nd qtr of 1846 at Elham, Kent. Hawtrey was living , at the time of the 1851 census,with his parents and siblings George Hawrey Camburn ( a scholar)Amy Lucas Camburn and Alfred James Camburn at 13 High Street, Elham. Also there was one butcher journeyman and one house servant. Hawtrey was attending school at that time.

At the time of the 1861 census Hawrey was living with his parents in Folkestone and his siblings Alfred, Martin,Florence and Caleb. Hawtrey at that time was working for his father as an assistant butcher. The rest of his siblings were in school. Also there was one journeyman butcher, one assistant and one domestic  servant.

In the 4th qtr of 1870 Hawtrey married Mary Ann Goble (1841-1922) at Elham, Kent and with her had the following children (1) Florence Alberta Camburn (1872-1942) (2) Hawtrey Camburn (1874-1885) (3) Marion Camburn (born 1877). All of the children were born in Folkestone. Mary Ann Gobel was born 1841 in Stelling, Kent, the daughter of George Goble (1811-1843) and Mary Goble, nee Broadbridge (1811-1886). He father died in Elham in the 1st qtr of 1843. At the time of the 1851 and 1861 census Mary was living with her widowed mother in Stelling Minnis , Kent and continued to live with her mother up to the time of her marriage to Hawtrey in 1870.

The 1871 census, taken at High Street in Folkestone gave Hawtrey as a butcher. With him was his wife Mary Ann, one domestic servant, one journeyman butcher and one assistant.

The 1881 census, taken at 13 Connaught Terrace in Folkestone gave Hawtrey as a master butcher. With him was his wife Mary Ann ; his children Florence, Hawtrey and Marion who were in school. Also there was one general servant and three butchers assistants.

The 1891 census, taken at 25 Colling Road in Folkestone, gave Hawtrey as a butcher employing others. With him was his wife Mary Ann and his children Florence and Marion and one servant.

The 1901 census, taken at 75 Cheriton Road in Folkestone gave Hawtrey as a butcher employing others. With him was his wife Mary Ann and his daughters Florence and Marion and one domestic servant.

The 1911 census, taken at 73 and 75 Cheriton Road, Folkestone, gave Hawtrey as a butcher. With him in premises of 10 rooms was his wife Mary Ann and one domestic servant. The census recorded that the couple had three children but that only two of them were still living, namely Florence and Marion.

Probate records gave Hawtrey John Camburn of 75 Cheriton Road, Folkestone when he died November 23,1920. The executors of his 5,886 pound estate was his widow Mary Ann, his solicitor and his spinster daughter Florence Alberta Camburn. Hawtrey was buried November 29th at the Folkestone Cemetery (Section A, grave 16). Mary Ann Camburn died in the 1st qtr of 1822 at Elham, Kent. Florence died January 16,1942 at East Glamorgan, Glamorganshire, Wales and never married. It was not established what happened to her sister Marion but it appears she died before 1920 as there was no mention of her in her fathers will of 1920.

Records of Weslayan Ministers gave Hawtrey being “educated at Elham, Kent, Ex-Poor, Soc., and Circuit Steward; Trustee, Class-leader, S.S. Supt, since 1888; Member of Dist. S.S. Com.; Treasurer of Grace Hill Church, also of Circuit Foreign Missions arid S.S Union; Es. Day-school Manager and Member of F.C.C.; Address: Heimhust, 75 Cheriton Road, Folkestone”.

[2] AMY LUCAS CAMBURN (born 1848)

Amy was born in the 3rd qtr of 1848 at Elham, Kent. Amy Lucas Camburn was living with her parents at the time of the 1851 census at 13 High Street, Elham, Kent along with her siblings Hawtrey John Camburn (a scholar) George Hawrey Camburn (a scholar)and Alfred James Camburn. Also there was one butcher journeyman and one house servant. At the time of the 1861 census Amy was not living with her parents but was living as a visitor at Barham, Kent.

In the 3rd qtr of 1868, at Elham, Kent she married James Yeames,A Weslayan Minister, (born 1843) and with him had eight children between 1869 and 1882 . She was living with her husband and children in Bermondsey, Surrey up to 1871 and then in 1872 was living at St Saviour, Southwark, London. In 1873  she was living in Leeds, Yorkshire and from 1878 to at least 1881 at Wolverhampton, Staffordshire. At the time of the 1881 census she and her husband and some of her children were living in Wolverhampton but in 1881 when her daughter Constance was born the family was living in Nottingham, Northamptonshire. When and where she died was not established and no trace of her was found after 1881. There is some indication that she died in Maine, USA following the immigration of her sons George and Herbert to the USA.

[3] ALFRED JAMES CAMBURN (1850-1920)

Alfred was born in the 2nd qtr of 1850 at Elham, Kent. Alfred was living, at the time of the 1851 census at 13 High Street, Elham with his parents and sibling Hawtrey John Camburn (a scholar), Amy Lucas Camburn and George Hawtrey Camburn (a scholar).

At the time of the 1861 census, taken at Folkestone, Alfred was in school and living with his parents and siblings Martin, Florence and Caleb, who were also in school except for his brother Hawtrey John Camburn who was working in his father’s butcher shop as an assistant.

At the time of the 1871 census Alfred was living with his parents and some of his siblings in Folkestone and working as a carpenter and joiner.  In the 3rd qtr of 1874 he married Frances Hannah Punnett (1848-1925) and with her had six children between 1875 and 1888. All of the children were born in Folkestone.

At the time of the 1881 census Alfred was a carpenter employing four men and two boys. In the 1891 census he was listed as a builder employer and had the same occupation at the time of the 1901 census. In the 1911 census he was a builder, decorator and undertaker.

His wife Frances died April 7,1925 in Folkestone and Alfred died November 23,1929 in Folkestone.

[4] MARTIN LUTHER CAMBURN (1852-1942)

Martin was born in the 3rd qtr of 1852 at Elham, Kent.  At the time of the 1861 census, taken at his father’s butcher shop in Folkestone, Martin was in school and living with his parents and brother Hawtrey (assistant butcher) and siblings Florence (scholar), and Caleb (a scholar). Also there was one journeyman butcher, one assistant and one domestic servant.

At the time of the 1881 census Martin was living as a boarder at Didsbury, Lancashire and a theological student at the Didsbury Weslayan Theological College.  On August 18,1886 at Leeds, Yorkhsire Martin married Elizabeth Naylor (born 1852) and with her had a son Reginald Douglas Camburn (1890-1978) who was born at Alexandria Bontull, Scotland.  Elizabeth Nalor, sometimes called Lillie, was the daughter of Joseph Naylor of Leeds

At the time of the 1901 census Martin was at Darlaston,Staffordshire and working as a Weslayan Minister. With him was his wife and son Reginald.

Martin died June 22,1942 at Knarlesborough, Yorkshire. Records of Weslayan Ministers noted that Martin was “President of Leigh and Darlington F.C.C. in 1903, 1906; Mayor of Darlington’s Chapter 1906”.

[5] FLORENCE CAMBURN (1854-1908)

Florence was born in the 4th qtr of 1854 at Elham, Kent. At the time of the 1861 census, Florence was living in Folkestone with her parents at the family butcher shop along with her siblings Hawtrey ( butchers assistant), Alfred (scholar), Martin (scholar) and Caleb (scholar). Also there was one journeyman butcher, one assistant and one domestic servant.

At the time of the 1871 census, taken at St John, Kent, Florence was a pupil and living as a lodger.

In the 4th qtr of 1880 at Elham, Kent Florence married William Fairburn Hart (1853-1936) and with him had three children between 1881 and 1889. The eldest daughter Winifred Mary Hart (1881-1936) was born in Leeds, Yorkshire. Her second daughter Elsie Camburn Hart (1882-1902) was born in Liverpool, Lancashire and her youngest child George Stanley Hart (1889-1916) was born in Leeds, Yorkshire.

At the time of the 1891 and 1901 census Florence was living with her husband and her children at Headingley with Burley, Yorkshire.

Florence died in the 4th qtr of 1908 at Leeds, Yorkshire. She was survived by her husband and three children.

[6] CALEB BUSS CAMBURN (1857-1943)  

Caleb was born in the 3rd qtr of 1857 at Elham, Kent. Caleb was living with his parents at the family butcher shop in Folkestone, Kent at the time of the 1861 census. He was attending school at that time. Also there was his siblings Hawtrey ( butchers assistant), Alfred (scholar), Martin (scholar) and Florence (scholar). Also there was one journeyman butcher, one assistant and one domestic servant.

At the time of the 1871 census Caleb was living as a brother in law in Bermondsey, Surrey  with James Yeams and attending school. James Yeams was was a Weslayan Minister. At the time of the 1881 census he was living with his brother George (a Weslayan Minister) at Headingly cum Burley, Yorkshire with the occupation of “certified teacher at school”.  At the time of the 1891 census he was living as a lodger at Hungerford, Berkshire on Church Street and working as a schoolmaster at Church Road.  At the time of the 1901 census he was living as a visitor at Newbury, Berkshire and working as a schoolmaster.  At the time of the 1911 census he was still single and living in a flat at 9 Charnham Street,Hungerford, Berkshire with the occupation of “  headmaster of school” and living in 2 rooms.

On April 12,1926 he departed from London and arrived May 1926 in New York, USA.  In October 1926 he departed from New York and arrived at London October 27,1926.

The Hungerford Virtual Museum website gives a detailed account of the life and career of Caleb. In part it states that “Caleb was the headsmaster of two Hungeford schools, and the founder of an important local educational charity. Caleb seems to have gained his teaching qualifications while studying at Peckham. In 1883 he was appointed headmaster at the Weslayan School in Church Street. When the new All-Age Council School opened in September 1910 Caleb was appointed the first headmaster, and he remained there until his retirement in March 1921.  In 1920 Caleb was awarded an MBE for his services, not as a teacher, but as Honorary Secretary to The Hungerford War Savings Committee. During his retirement he sailed in 1926 on the SS MINNEKAHDA from London to New York. Also during his retirement he contributed to the book ‘ The Story of Hungerford’ written by the Rev. W.H., Summers, by writing the final chapter.

Caleb died August 13,1943 at 48 Pevensey Road, St Leonards-on-Sea, Sussex. In his will he left around 1,400 pounds. One of the beneficiaries of his will was George Albert Pocock, a H.M. Inspector of the Board of Education and from it The Camburn Education Trust was formed.

Shown above are two photographs, one of Caleb taken in 1910 and a group photo of Caleb and pupils taken in 1902.

[7] ALBERT EDWARD CAMBURN (1862-1900)

Albert was born in the 2nd qtr of 1862 at Folkestone, Kent. He was living with his parents and siblings in Folkestone at the time of the 1871 and attending school.  At the time of the 1881 census he was living with his parents and working as a drapers assistant.

In the 3rd qtr of 1890 he married Annie Elizabeth Tierney (born 1864) and with her had two children namely (1) Kathleen Camburn (1891-1975) (2) Dora Camburn (1894-1978). His daughter Kathleen was born June 8,1891 at Brixton, Surrey and his daughter was born at Brixton September 22,1894.

At the time of the 1891 census Albert was living with his wife and daughter Kathleen at Lambeth, London and working as a warehouseman.

Albert died in Lambeth. London January 12,1900 at just age 38.He was survived by his wife and two daughters.

[8] MADELINE HANNAH CAMBURN (1868-1933)

Madeline was born in the 4th qtr of 1868 at Folkestone, Kent. At the time of the 1871 census and 1881 census she was living with her parents in Folkestone and was attending school.

The 1891 census recorded Madeline living as a boarder in Folkestone. At the time of the 1901 census she was living in Paddlesworth, Kent on own means.

Madeline never married. She died at Billericay, Essex April 25,1933.

THE LIFE AND TIMES OF GEORGE HAWTREY CAMBURN

George, the central figure in this article, was born in the 3rd qtr of 1844 at Elham, Kent, one of nine children born to George Alfred Camburn (1821-1882) and Amy Camburn, nee Buss (1823-1897). Shown opposite is a photograph of George taken later in life. This image is from a family group photograph which is presented in its entirety later in this article. Below this image is a second photo showing George on the right with his family.

When the 1851 census was taken George was living with his parents at 13 High Street, Elham in premises at the family butcher shop. Also in the home were his siblings Hawtrey, Amy and Alfred; one butchers journeyman and one house servant. George at that time was attending school.  From 1869 to 1871 George was living at City Road in London. The Methodist Magazine 1869-1870 listed “George H. Camburn, Weslayan Minister, First London District” and that he had commenced service as a Weslayan Minister in 1868.

At the time of the 1871 census, George was living as a visitor at All Saints, Northamptonshire and working as a Weslayan Minister. The records of Weslayan Ministers noted that George had been educated at Elham and then at Didsbury College. He had spent” twenty one years as the District Home Mission Secretary; Organized Condon City Association for Young Men from country in City and other houses of business; member of Home Missions Com. Lived for a time at Mill Bank, Wellington, Salop”.

From ‘Hall’s Circuits and Ministers 1765-1885’ was a listing “ George H. Camburn 1884-1885 Tunbridge Wells”.

In the 4th qtr of 1872 George married Hannah Read Fowler (1848-1930) at Altricham, Cheshire.  Hannah was born in the 2nd qtr of 1848 at Chorlton, Lancashire and was one of several children born to Mark Hornsey Fowler (1815-1881) and Hannah Fowler, nee Read (1815-1880). Hannah was living with her parents and siblings at Ardwick, Lancashire at the time of the 1861 census and with them at Sale, Cheshire at the time of the 1871 census.

George and Hannah had the following children (1) Hilda Camburn (1873-1955) who was born in the 3rd qtr of 1873 at Bow, London (2) Ethel Camburn (1873-1956) who was born in the 3rd qtr of 1873 at Bow, London (3) Claude Fowler Camburn (1875-1945) who was born at Bow, London. (4) Harold Hawtrey Camburn (1876-1956) who was born November 8,1876 at Sutton, Surrey.

At the time of the 1881 census George and his family were living at Headingley cum Burley,Yorkshire and working as a Weslayan Minister.

At the time of the 1891 census George was living with his family at Croydon, Surrey and working as a Weslayan Minister.

At the time of the 1901 census George was living in Alford, Lincolnshire with his wife and family and working as a  Weslayan Minister, By 1911 all of his children had left home and he and his wife were living at Wellington Urban, Shropshire where he was still working as a Weslayan Minister.

Sometime after 1911 George and his wife moved to Tunbridge Wells. He died in Tunbridge Wells on January 27,1919 and was buried in the Tunbridge Wells Borough Cemetery on January 31,1919. George had been living at the time of his death at 14 Mereworth Road,Tunbridge Wells and left an estate of some 649 pounds to his wife Hannah and his sons Claude and Harold, a photographic artist.

The death of his wife Hannah was recorded at Ticehurst, Sussex April 20,1930. She was buried in the Tunbridge Wells Borough Cemetery on April 23,1930.

THE CHILDREN OF REV GEORGE HAWTREY CAMBURN

As noted in the previous section George and his wife Hannah Read Camburn, nee Fowler( 1848-1930) had four children  (1) Hilda Camburn (1873-1955) who was born in the 3rd qtr of 1873 at Bow, London (2) Ethel Camburn (1873-1956) who was born in the 3rd qtr of 1873 at Bow, London (3) Claude Fowler Camburn (1875-1945) who was born at Bow, London. (4) Harold Hawtrey Camburn (1876-1956) who was born November 8,1876 at Sutton, Surrey. Below is given some brief information about them.

[1] HILDA CAMBURN (1873-1955) 

Hilda was born in the 3rd qtr of 1873 at Bow, London and was a twin sister of Ethel. She was living with her parents and siblings at  Bow London in 1875  and at Sutton, Surrey in the fall of 1876.

At the time of the 1881 census she was living with her parents and siblings at Headingley cum Burley, Yorkshire and was still living with them when the census was taken at Croydon, Surrey in 1891 and at Alford, Lincolnshire when the census was taken at Alford, Lincolnshire. She was still living with her parents when the census was taken in 1911 at Wellington Urban, Shropshire.

Hilda died as a spinster December 7,1955 at Gosport, Hampshire but the probate record gave her residence at Dartford. Probate records indiate that she was a resident of the Wray House Nursing Home at Havant,Hampshire.

Shown above is a photograph of Hilda and her sister Ethel taken at the family home.

[2] ETHEL CAMBURN (1873-1956)

Ethel was born in the 3rd qtr of 1873 at Bow, London and was a twin sister of Hilda. She was living with her parents and siblings at  Bow London in 1875  and at Sutton, Surrey in the fall of 1876.

At the time of the 1881 census she was living with her parents and siblings at Headingley cum Burley, Yorkshire and was still living with them when the census was taken at Croydon, Surrey in 1891 and at Alford, Lincolnshire when the census was taken at Alford, Lincolnshire. She was still living with her parents when the census was taken in 1911 at Wellington Urban, Shropshire.

Ethel was living with her spinster sister Hilda in Dartford in the 1950’s. Her death was recorded in the 3rd qtr of 1956 at Gosport, Hampshire. Probate records noted that Ethel died a spinster on August 14,1856 at the Wray House Nursing Home at Havant,Hampshire.

[3] CLAUDE FOWLER CAMBURN (1875-1945)

Claude was born in the 3rd qtr of 1875 at Bow, London. At the time of the 1881 census he was living with his parents and siblings at Headingley cum Burley, Yorkshire and with them at the time of the 1891 census in Croydon, Surrey where he attended school.

The 1911 census, taken at High View, Victoria Hill Road, Hextable, Swanley Junction Kent, recorded Claude Fowler Camburn as age 35, single, and working as a nurseryman employer in partnership with Edwin Ingman Pitts, age 33, also a nurseryman employer. Claude is given in the census as a partner with Edwin. Also in the home were two domestic servants.

On February 15,1916 Claude enlisted in the army and was mobalized on November 2,1916.Claude's occupation was given in his military records as a market grower. Claude (regimental #23243) was a private in the Royal Army Veterinary Corps.Claude was not a well man and was admitted to the Brook War Hospital in May 1918 with stomach and intestinal problems and remained there for two weeks.The doctors said his condition was "agrivated by present war".A subsequent medical report gives a long list of health concerns including problems with vision,hearing,digestion and much more. On January 8. 1919 he was discharged from the army as "no longer physically fit for war service".His address in his pension records was given as ‘Rosemont’ Mereworth Road,Tunbridge Wells, which was the same address that Harold Camburn and his wife were living at in 1911.He gave his father as his next of kin. His discharge may have occurred just in time for him to see his father for the last time.

Claude Fowler Camburn married in September 1926 Maude Evelyn Doyle (1876-1941) at Knaresborough, Yorkshire, West Riding. Maude was the daughter of James Alfred Doyle(1830-1912) and Elizabeth Ruth Marsh(1847-1927) and was one of several children born to the couple. Maude had been baptised December 31,1876 at Wrangthorn,St Augustine,Yorkshire. She lived with her parents up to the time of her marriage at Leeds,Yorkshire. She had been born 1876 at Leeds and died May 24,1941 while a resident of Hulls 98 Firehall Road, Hawley, near Dartford,Kent.Probate records show she left her 6,795 pound estate to her husband Claude, who was identified at that time as a nurseryman. The other executor of her estate was Frank Russell Doyle, a motor salesman, and probably one of her brothers.

Probate records give that Claude Fowler Camburn was of 98 Shirehall Rd, Hawley near Dartford, Kent when he died October 26,1945 at Torbay Hospital,Torquay (image above). The executors of his 8,843 pound estate were his brother Harold Hawtrey Camburn, photographer, and George Walter Chancellor, solicitor. Claude’s wife died in 1941.

A photograph of Claude and his family are shown in the next section of this article.

[4] HAROLD HAWTREY CAMBURN (1876-1956)

Harold was the youngest of the four children in the family. He had been born November 8,1876 at Sutton Surrey and was baptised December 21,1876 at the parish church.

Harold lived with his parents and siblings in Sutton Surrey in the 1870’s and at the time of the 1881 census at Headingley cim Burley, Yorkshire and at the time of the 1891 census at Croydon, Surrey.

In 1901 Harold ,now age 25,was living on his own as a boarder at 33 St.Mary's Road ,Parish of Tonbridge with the occupation of photographer and is recorded as a "Worker" rather than an employer or working on own account,confirming that by this time he was working as a photographer for someone else. Soon after he moved to Tunbridge Wells and worked in partnership with Tunbridge Wells photographer Percy Squire Lankester (1866-1930)from a large studio in the north wing of the Great Hall (photo opposite) on Mount Pleasant Road, under the name of Lankester & Co.

Camburn continued to work with Lankester at the Great Hall Studios until he decided to strike out on his own in 1904 establishing his business premises at 21 Grove Hill Road and began to promote himself as a photographer and photographic printer.Also about 1906 Camburn purchased one of the Rotary Photographic Postcard Printing machines manufactured by Ellis Graber of Tunbridge Wells, which machines were surperior to others on the market at that time and allowed Harold to print off his postcard views in a high speed and high quality manner. Shown opposite is a postcard view of Grove Hill Road by Harold Camburn. His studio was located on the west side of Grove Hill Road beside the Courier newspaper building.

In the 2nd qtr of 1909 Harold wed Mary Jane Gillett(1876-1967) in Tunbridge Wells at the Weslayan Church on London Road (image opposite). Harold's father performed the wedding ceremony. Mary was born in 1877 at Bidborough,Kent.Her father was William Gillett born 1845 at Bidborough.When William was a boy and young man he worked on his father’s 96 acre farm at Bidborough but later in life became a carpenter and then a builder employing 4 men and 2 boys.Mary's mother was Harriet Gillett born 1843 at Brighton and was a homemaker. Mary's parents were wed in 1869 at Bidborough and produced 3 daughters and 3 sons. Mary had been living with her parents and some of her siblings in Tunbridge Wells since at least 1901 and after her marriage to Harold helped him in the business.

The 1911 census, taken at 17 Rosemont, Mereworth Road  Tunbridge Wells listed Harold as a photographic printer and publisher. Living with him in the 7 room residence was just his wife. The census records that they had no children at that time and there is no record that the couple ever had any children.

Shown opposite is a family photograph of the Camburns taken sometime between 1911 and 1916, before Harold and his brother enlisted for service in the war. This image was printed on card stock and on the back is Camburns Wells Series logo with rope and bucket, which dates it to 1911 or afterwards.  This photograph was provided to me by Stephen Reeves, who while at the Shepton Mallet postcard fair in 2014 managed to meet a person selling cards who said he had purchased from an auction of the estate of the Camburn family a family photograph album. In this image the gentleman on the left is Harold Camburn and the lady to the right is his wife. In the back row the man to the left wearing glasses is Harold’s brother Claude and the lady beside him is believed to be Claude’s wife . It is believed that the children shown are those of Claude Camburn. Also shown in the back row is a lady believed to be one of Harold’s sisters and to the far right is a photograph of Harold’s father George Hawtrey Camburn.

The service records for Harold Hawtrey Camburn,as obtained from the National Archives,record him as # F225844 ;born November 8,1876 Sutton Surrey; occupation-photographer. His records show he enlisted February 22,1917 "for hostilities only"and became an Air Mechanic 2nd class with the Royal Naval Air Service(RNAS).Following enlistment Camburn was sent to the RNAS station at Wormwood Scrubs for initial training of two months. The 1919 publication entited “The Aeroplane ,the Anternational Air Transport Journal’ listed “ 225844 Ist Air Mechanic H.H. Canburn (Mediterranean)”.

A magazine produced for the troops at Chingford called "The Chingflier" contains a couple of passing references to Harold Camburn,but only in general terms. Camburn served in England from February 23,1917 until April 24,1917 although another naval record has him being posted to the Eastern Mediterranean on June 30,1917 where he saw service in the Aegean Sea  until March 31,1918.On April 1,1918 the RNAS was merged with the Royal Flying Corps and became the Royal Air Force (RAF) and it is because of this that Camburn's service records report him being dischaged at Chingford the end of March 1918.Camburn was not however in Chingford on that date but remained instead in the Aegean with the RAF as an air mechanic until the end of hostilities in 1919 and it was at that time he was discharged from service and returned to civilian life. Camburn is mentioned in despatches(London Gazette Jan 1,1919) for services in the Mediterranean which confirms his RAF service.In the Aegean the RNAS/RAF had a naval yard and aerodrome at Mudros on the island of Lemnos and it was probably here that Camburn was stationed.Records of medals issued record that Harold only received the British War Medal for serving  sometime in the period of 1914-1918 in a theatre of war.The fact that Camburn was not given the 1914-1915 Star is further proof that he did not enlist in 1914 as some have suggested.

Harold Camburn donated to the Fleet Air Arm Museum a collection of over 800 photographs he took during the war. All of the photographs, contained in two albums,and catalogued on a list available from the museum,are of the RNAS on the Greek Islands and Aegean Sea during the 1914-1918 Dardenelles Campaign(about 80%) with the remaining 20% being taken by Camburn while at Chingford.

In 1919 Harold returned to Tunbridge Wells taking over the business from his wife (who with an assistant ran the business while her husband was in war service) and resumed operations at 21 Grove Hill Road,continuing to publish postcards at this business address up to the end of 1923.

In 1924 Camburn appeared in the directories at two locations namely 21 Grove Hill Road and 80 St.John's Road but from 1925 onwards is given only at 80 St. John's Road and later 80-82 St John’s road.

In 1951 Camburn retired from business,vacated his premises on St.John's Road and sold his printing equipment and other supplies to Tempo Laboratories Ltd. When Camburn retired in 1951 he and his wife moved to Havant,Hampshire to live out the remainder of their years.Unfortunatley it was a rather short retirement for Harold as he passed away in the 3rd qtr of 1956 at Portsmouth,Hampshire leaving a modest sum in his will.His wife Mary passed away at Gosport, Hampshire April-June 1967.For further details about Camburn’s photographic career, of some 40 years in Tunbridge Wells, see my article ‘The Life and Times of Harold Camburn’ dated August 12,2011 (updated March 23,2018).


THE HUSSEY FAMILY AND SCOTNEY CASTLE

Written By: Edward James Gilbert-Thunder Bay, Ontario, Canada

Date: May 21,2018

INTRODUCTION

My interest in Scotney Castle and the Hussey family relates primarily to a series of photographs in the form of CDV’s and postcards produced of the castle and the Hussey family by Tunbridge Wells photographers Harold H. Camburn, George Glanville , H. G. Inskipp , H. P. Robinson and Photochrom, which images are featured in this article.

Scotney Castle, located in Lamberhurst about 3-1/2 miles from the town of Tunbridge Wells ,has for many years been in the hands of the National Trust. Scotney Castle is actually two castles, referred to as the “Old Castle” and “Scotney New Castle”. The original castle was built in the valley of the River Bewl back in the 14th century by Roger de Ashburnham, the Conservator of the Peace in Kent. Today only part of the old castle remains.  The castle belonged to the Darrell family for some 350 years until 1778  when Edward Hussey bought the castle from the Darrell family. Around 1830 his grandson Edward Hussey(1807-1894),  a Justice of the Peace and Magistrate with a degree in law became actively involved in the castle and had the Scotney New Castle built to the designs of architect Anthony Salvin. Edward slept in the new castle for the first time on May 29,1843 and lived there for 10 years as a bachelor until he married Henrietta Windsor-Clive (the great grand-daughter of Clive of India) in 1853. The couple had seven children together between 1855 and 1865, which resulted in the castle becoming the family home.

When Edward Hussey died in 1894 he left Scotney Castle to his eldest son Edward Windsor Hussey (1855-1952).  On Christopher Hussey’s death in 1970 the estate was left to the National Trust who let out several apartments in the castle.Following the death of Elizabeth Hussey in 2006, who lived in the castle, it was opened to the public for the first time on June 6,2007. Situated on some 770 acres with trails through the hillside gardens and through a lovely woodland, it has become a popular tourist site.  Shown at the top of this section is a print showing Scotney Castle dated 1786. Below it is a postcard view of the old Scotney Castle by the Tunbridge Wells firm of Photochrom. The last image in this section is a modern postcard view of the Scotney New Castle.

A number of websites provide information and other images of Scotney Castle which should be consulted for those interested in a more detailed account about the history of the castle and its occupants.

THE HUSSEY FAMILY

As noted in the introduction, Edward Hussey bought Scotney Castle from the Darrell family in 1778 and since that time several generations of the family have resided there, the last being Elizabeth Hussey in 2006. This Edward Hussey is often for reasons of clarity known as Edward Hussy I (1749-1816). He married Elizabeth Sarah Bridge (1754-1793) June 14,1775 at Banstone, Essex. He and his wife had five children including Edward Hussey II (1780-1817)who was born July 4,1780 at Scotney Castle. Edward Hussey II and his wife Ann Jemmett (1785-1858) had one daughter and a son Edward Hussey III (1807-1894).

Edward Hussey III was born in London July 13,1807. He spent most of his childhood living in Charing (near Ashford) and London. His father and grandfather had died within a year of each other and Edward’s mother thought their deaths was due to bad air in the old Scotney Castle.

Edward graduated with a degree in law and was a Justice of the Peace and a senior magistrate. At the age of 21 he became actively involved in the Scotney estate. His interests included the production of an estate map and tree planting. In the 1830’s he made a list of ‘objections to the Present House at Scotney’ which included a lack of bedrooms, the cold and damp in the evenings and that the entrance was bad in wet weather. On November 10,1834 he met with architect Anthony Salvin for the first time. This was the first of 33 meetings that they held to design the new castle. Edward also met with William Sawrey Gilpin ( a garden designer) to make changes to the gardens and terraces. A large part of the old castle was deliberately ruined to create a picturesque ruin in the garden landscape. Edward slept in the new castle for the first time May 29,1843 and lived there as a bachelor up to the time of his marriage in 1853.

Edward Hussey III(1807-1894) married Henrietta Windsor-Clive (1820-1899), the great grand-daughter of Clive of India, in 1853, and had six children together and made the “Scotney New Castle “ their home. Shown opposite is a CDV  showing Edward and his wife circa 1854 by Tunbridge Wells photographer H. G. Inskipp.

Details about H.G. Inskipp were given in my article ‘ H.G. Inskipp-A Tunbridge Wells Photographer’ dated January 9,2014. From the ‘Overview” of that article I wrote the following. Henry Guy Inskipp was born 1840 in Battle, Sussex, one of several children born to Henry Inskipp(1812-1867), a druggist, and later an innkeeper of the George Hotel in Dover. He received his early education in Battle, Sussex and during the early 1850’s he lived with his parents and siblings in rooms at the George Inn/Hotel  on Snargate Street in Dover. In the 1860’s, while working as a warehouseman, H.G. Inskipp decided to make photography his career, and was operating from premises on the High Street in Sevenoaks,Kent. In the early 1870’s his photographic work was conducted from premises in Southborough,but by the late 1870’s established a photographic studio at 13 Calverley Road,Tunbridge Wells. It was  throughout the period of 1871 to 1878 that he was most active in showing his photographs at the exhibitions of the Royal Photographic Society. Henry had entered photography at the time of the magic lantern, for which he made and sold glass plates. He expanded his business to include stereographic views, postcards, and carde-de-visites. Henry was both a studio photographer, where his subjects came finely dressed and were posed with the assistance of interesting props to achieve the most complimentary image of his subjects, as well as a field photographer of important buildings, street scenes, and the English countryside, many of which he produced as postcards. Where Henry lived and worked can be traced by the locale of his photographic images for, apart from his studio work, tended to photograph local views, however examples of his work from further afield can also be found, indicating that he often went on photographic excursions. All of his images however are confined to England. Henry left Tunbridge Wells by 1885 and from that year, until his death in 1888 he lived and worked in Steyning ,Sussex.

The seven children born to Edward Hussey III and his wife Henrietta were (1) Edward Windsor Hussey (1855-1952) (2) Major William Clive Hussey (1858-1928) (3) Gertrude Anne Hussey (1861-1921) (4) Brig Gen Arthur Herbert Hussey (1863-1923) (5) Mildred Harriet Hussey (1863-1952) (6) Mary Anne Hussey (1864-1942) (7) Henry Percy Hussey (born 1865) . The National Trust has in their collection a large series of photographs of Scotney Castle including a nice selection of images of the Hussey family taken over a number of years while residing there. Of those images only the ones taken by identified Tunbridge Wells photographers are given in this article, except for the photograph above of Edward Hussey III and his wife taken by an unidentified photographer dated circa 1907-1910.

Shown opposite is a postcard by Harold H. Camburn showing a plaque at Scotney Castle that makes reference to the Hussey family. Harold Hawtrey Camburn worked as a photographer for over 40 years in Tunbridge Wells. In addition to his portrait studio work he produced an estimated 10,000 postcard views of Kent and Sussex and a few other counties in southern England. He is considered by many to be one of the best, if not the best, photographer of the town due largely to the quality of his work. Details about him and his career were given in my article ‘ The Life and Times of Harold Camburn’ dated August 13,2011 (updated March 23,2018).

Shown below are two portrait photographs of Mrs Henrietta Hussey, taken by Tunbridge Wells photographer George Glanville. Details about the life and career of George Glanville were given in my article ‘ Glanville, Skinner & Wyles-Photographers’ dated March 21,2012. George Glanville was born 1846 in Sutton Surrey . He came to Tunbridge Wells in the late 19th century and for a time operated studios on the High Street and on The Broadway ( Mount Pleasant Road opposite the SER station). In 1893 he went into partnership first with Mr Shinner and late Mr Wyles.  Pet photography was one of George’s specialties but did studio work of all kinds and occasionally some field photography. He died  in Tunbridge Wells April 19,1925.























Shown below are two more photographs of the Hussey family by George Glanville. The one on the left is a group photo of the family dated circa 1886. In the image on the right is shown left to right Gertrude, her brother Henry Percy and her sister Mildred, which image is dated circa 1885-1890.




The last images featured are the two opposite of Gertrude Anne Hussey. The one on the left is by the noted Tunbridge Wells photographer H.P. Robinson who had his studio in the north wing of the Great Hall on Mount Pleasant Road until it was taken over by photographer Percy Squire Lankester. This image dates from circa 1876. The image to the right is another by George Glanville and dates from about 1883.
Details about the life and career of H.P. Robinson was given in my article ‘ The Photographic Careers of Robinson and Cherrill’ dated September 1,2013. From the ‘overview’ of that article I wrote the following. In 1872 the Great Hall on Mount Pleasant Road was constructed. In addition to a central hall it had two wings. The south wing was taken initially by Isaac Terry of the Clarence Hotel as a restaurant and coffee room and later became the Claremont Hotel. The north wing was initially taken by H.P. Robinson and N.K. Cherrill as their photographic studio and they erected additional glass houses round the side of the building to carry on their business.  The two men had operated on their own initially but formed a partnership. They operated initially from 1868 to 1871 from a studio at #1 Grove Villa but moved to the Great hall in 1872 and remained in partnership there throughout 1872 to 1875 until the partnership was dissolved by March1876 and the two gentlemen went their separate ways.  In 1874 Cherrill also had a studio at #1 Fern Villas on Queens Road .In May 1876 Cherrill left England and established a photographic business in New Zealand. In 1881 Cherrill returned to England, having disposed of his studio in New Zealand. Henry Peach Robinson had actually retired from photography in 1865 due to an illness brought on by his exposure to photographic chemicals but by 1868 came out of retirement to be the senior partner with Cherrill. After Cherrill left , Henry Peach Robinson continued to have his studio at the Great Hall until he decided to retire in 1888 and his son took over the studio for a brief period. The 1882 Kelly records Robinson living at 15 Mount Sion.Robinson left Tunbridge Wells in 1901 and moved to London.The photographic studio at the Great Hall, after Robinson’s departure, became that of local photographer Percy Squire Lankester(1866-1930) who operated initially as Lankester & Warren and later as Lankester & Co. and who remained at the Great Hall until relocating to new premises in the early 1920’s. Lankester is listed in the 1899 Kelly directory as being at the Great hall studio. The Robinson and Cherrill partnership was not only successful in terms of the praise,and medals,lavished on their art-productions,but also financially rewarding. In 1872 they announced their occupation of a brand new studio,"of very magnificent proportions".Their studio was proclaimed "one of the finest establishments of its kind in the country", this studio being the one at the Great Hall.

 

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