ALL ABOUT
TUNBRIDGE WELLS

Page 3

 

THE HISTORY OF SUSSEX HOUSE 61 THE PANTILES

Written By: Edward James Gilbert-Thunder Bay,Ontario, Canada

Date: August 4,2016

OVERVIEW

The history of the Pantiles dates back to the early 17th century, and today is a much visited and patronized commercial district of the town. The history of this place is well described in many accounts including a booklet by Philip Whitbourn produced for the Civic Society in 2014.

In 1636 two buildings were erected near the Wells, where cups of the towns renowned waters were consumed by visitors to the town. In 1636 the Upper Walk of the Pantiles was created but destroyed by fire in 1687 and had to be rebuilt. Logans map of 1748 shows the Upper Walk consisting of a range of shops from one end of the Pantiles to the other as well as buildings between the Upper and Lower walks.

Of particular interest is Kips birds eye view of the Pantiles from 1719 which shows a row of buildings in the Lower Walk including the Red Lion(sp Lyon) Inn on the spot of what is now Sussex House at 61 Pantiles, next to which was an attached building which by 1840 was known as the Sussex Commercial House, and just to the north of it was the Sussex Hotel. Some artists drawings from 1830 and 1840 show all three buildings.

The Red Lion remained in operation for a number of years but soon came into use as a lodging/ boarding house. By 1808 there were some fourteen lodging houses in the Pantiles.

The 1841 census, taken at Sussex House showed it was occupied by Richard Gellett and his wife as well as Richard Nash, the postmaster and his wife. Richard Gellett had been the proprietor of the Sussex Hotel in 1840 but was run by Thomas Whitmarsh at the time of the 1841 census. Richard Gellett died in Tunbridge Wells in 1844.

By 1899 No. 61 Ye Pantiles was a lodging house operated by David Frederick Cooke.

By 1901 and up to at least 1913 No. 61 Pantiles was a boarding house run by Miss Mary Ann Robinson (b 1856) and her close friend Miss Annie Thompson (b 1856). The 1911 census described this building as “Sussex House” with fourteen rooms.

Sussex House continued as a lodging/boarding house until the early 1950’s when it became the premises of the Royal Tunbridge Wells Art Society, that had been formed in 1934. This building is still occupied by them on the main floor, but there are three flats above. In the summer of 2015, when my friend Mrs Susan Prince and I visited the town , there was an exhibition of art in this building, which we thoroughly enjoyed seeing. A small painting of the Pantiles was purchased at this exhibition and is now hanging on my bedroom wall. During the great storm, later in 2015 ,much of the Pantiles was flooded with about two feet of water. After drying out the premises Sussex House continues to be a place where art exhibitions are held.

An article dated November 4,2010 in the Eastern Daily Press, entitled ‘Future Plans for the Pantiles Thrown Into Doubt’ reported that Targetfollow, who owns buildings in the Lower Walks of the Pantiles had run into some financial difficulties and stated “ The troubled company had major plans for developing the Pantiles including revamping the Corn Exchange and Sussex House, which it no longer owns”.

This article provides a number of interesting images of Sussex House and provides a brief , although not complete, history of the building.

SUSSEX HOUSE-ITS LOCATION AND OCCUPANCY

I begin my account with the image opposite of Kips 1719 birds eye view of the Pantiles looking north. On the bottom right hand corner of this map (with the red roof)is shown a building labelled as the “Red Lion”, which is on the site of the building we know today as Sussex House at 61 Pantiles. This was a pub with rooms above for guests visiting the town. It’s name is sometimes also given as the “Red Lyon” as can be seen on the next map. How long this pub/inn operated is not known but it is not found in Pigots 1823 directory.

Shown below  is a map of 1738 by Bowra of the Pantiles. On the bottom left hand side of this map can be seen a row of buildings that include the “Red Lyon” (note spelling) with a building attached to the north of it, then a lane, and then the Sussex Hotel (highlighted in yellow). This layout of buildings coincides with the map of 1719. Note on this map the reference to  “Robert Mercer occupier”.

























Shown opposite is an artist’s drawing dated 1830 from Cliffords 1830 guide. Sussex House is the one on the far right.

Shown below  is an artist’s drawing dated 1840 by J.E. Harwood, on which can be seen Sussex House on the right with a building labelled as “Sussex Commercial Hotel” attached to the north of it, followed by the Sussex Hotel. Note the name of Whitmarsh over the entrance to the hotel.

The 1840 Pigots directory gave the listing “ Royal Sussex Hotel, Richard Gellett, Parade”. The 1841 census, taken at the Sussex Hotel gave Thomas Whitmarsh, age 58, as the proprietor of the Sussex Hotel. The 1841 census, taken at “Sussex House” gave it being occupied by Richard Gellett, age 78, born 1763. With him was his spinster daughter Sarah Gellett,age 40, born 1801. Richard was given as a man of independent means. Also there was Robert Nash, age 34. Born 1807 in Frant, who’s occupation was given as postmaster. His wife Emma, age 30 and two others were also living there.

The will of Richard Gellett was probated on November 22,1844. He is identified in the will as “of the Royal Victoria and Sussex Hotel”. He was a widow, and had been for many years before the 1841 census. His will refers to having two  daughters and that his daughter Sarah (from the 1841 census) and Robert Nash were appointed executors. Richard left his estate to his daughter Sarah and to Emma Nash who may well have been Richards second daughter. It was interesting to note that in 1811 Richard Gellett was the proprietor of the Red Lion Inn in London before moving to Tunbridge Wells. Richard was buried in Frant,Sussex March 30,1844.

The use and occupancy of Sussex House after the 1840’s and up to 1898 is not well defined but it is likely it continued in use as a lodging house The 1899 Kelly directory gave the listing “ David Frederick Cooke, 61 Ye Pantiles, boarding house”. No definitive information was found out about him except that he was gone from Sussex House by 1901.

The 1901 census, taken at 62 Pantiles gave the occupant as Mary Ann Robinson, born 1859 at Bruton, Somerset. Her occupation was given as “ proprietor lodging house”. With her was one servant and eight boarders. The 1913 Kelly directory gave the same listing for Miss Robinson. Directories of 1918 t0 1922 gave her at 16 Bartholomew Apartments in Dover.

The 1911 census, taken at Sussex House, 61 The Pantiles, a building of 14 rooms, gave Mary Ann Robinson as single, age 55, born 1856 in Bruton, Somerset, and a proprietor of a boarding house. With her was miss Annie TGhompson, age 55, born 1856 in Paddington, London, who with Mary was also a boarding house proprietor. With them were one boarder and two servants.

Mary Ann Robinson had been baptised at Bruton, Somerset on May 29,1857 and was the daughter of John and Sarah Robinson. She is found in the 1861 census, at Bruton, Somerset with her parents and three siblings. Her father at that time was operating a druggist shop on the High Street. Mary was still living with her family at Bruton at the time of the 1871 census. The 1881 census, taken at 81 Kings Road, Brighton, Sussex, gave both Mary Ann Robinson and her friend Annie Thompson as shop assistants, working for David Multon, a confectioner. The 1891 census, taken at Camberwell, gave Mary Ann Robinson and her friend Annie Thompson living and working together. Mary Ann was the manageress of a confectioners shop and Annie was her assistant. Sometime after 1899 Mary and Annie moved to Tunbridge Wells to operate their boarding house at Sussex House. Shown opposite are two images pertaining to Sussex House which mention both Mary and Annie. These images are from a booklet recently offered for sale on ebay. Note the rates charged for the rooms and for extras and the meal schedule.

Although there is not definitive information for the period after 1913 up to the 1950’s Sussex House likely continued to be a boarding house, where visitors to the town stayed during the season.

This building was listed by English Heritage May 20,1952. The listing details are as follows. THE PANTILES 1. 1746 (South East Side) No 57 (Glen Albion) No 59 (Sussex Place) No 61 (Sussex House) TQ 5838 NW 1/9 20.5.52. II CV 2. 3 early Cl9 houses. 3 storeys stuccoed the ground floor rusticated. Parapet with stone coping. Stringcourse above each floor. 3 windows each with most glazing bars intact. Doorcases with 6 panel moulded doors and segmental fanlights. No 61 has a higher elevation than the others, projects and has a fine cast iron balcony on the 1st floor. Nos 45 to 61 (odd) form a group together with Nos 21 to 31a (odd). Nos 2 to 28 (even) and Nos 38 to 72 (even) form a group.

The Royal Tunbridge Wells Art Society, that was founded in 1934, according to their webite, “took over the premises at 61 The Pantiles in the early 1950’s. This Society is unique in having its own rooms. These consist of a main lecture/exhibition room and a further room housing the magazine, book and video libraries. There is also a small kitcvhen. The buildings on the Lower Walks of the Pantiles were refurbished in 1991, so the Society now enjoys the benefits of improved lighting, heating and storage areas. Members pay an annual subscription of 90 pounds and this money is used to pay for the rent, rates and the cost of the premises. Also for engaging speakers and demonstrators”.

It was also noted from a local estate agent, the source of one of the modern photos above, that there are three flats in Sussex House on the upper floors.

In the summer of 2015, when my friend Mrs Susan Prince and I visited the town , there was an exhibition of art in this building, which we thoroughly enjoyed seeing. A small painting of the Pantiles was purchased at this exhibition and is now hanging on my bedroom wall. During the great storm, later in 2015 ,much of the Pantiles was flooded with about two feet of water. After drying out the premises Sussex House continues to be a place where art exhibitions are held.

An article dated November 4,2010 in the Eastern Daily Press, entitled ‘Future Plans for the Pantiles Thrown Into Doubt’ reported that Targetfollow, who owns buildings in the Lower Walks of the Pantiles had run into some financial difficulties and stated “ The troubled company had major plans for developing the Pantiles including revamping the Corn Exchange and Sussex House, which it no longer owns”.

 

GEORGE CROSS THE ELECTRICIAN AND RADIO ENGINEER

Written By: Edward James Gilbert-Thunder Bay, Ontario, Canada

Date: August 5,2016

OVERVIEW

George Cross, born 1876 at St Lukes, London was one of at least ten children born to Alfred William Cross  and Elizabeth Sarah Cross. His father worked most of his life in London repairing sewing machines.

In 1881 while living with his parents and siblings at 16 Radnor Street in London George attended school but did not receive a university or trade school education. At the time of the 1891 census he was still living on Radnor Street with his parents and siblings but was working as an errand boy. By 1901 he had left home, and with his older brother Alfred James Cross (born 1870 in London) he opened an electric engineers shop at 27 Ye Pantiles on the lower walk opposite the old fish market in the middle of the Pantiles. At this shop they sold electric lighting fixtures and a few appliances,but also worked as electricians electrifying peoples premises.

Electricity was an exciting invention and the Electrical Exhibition at the old Town Hall (image opposite)  on Calverley Road  October 11,1895 drew a large crowd. This event was held under the auspices of Sir David Lionel Salomons of Broomhill during his Mayoral year. This event celebrated the coming of electricity to the town by way of a power station in Upper Grosvenor Road. The Town Hall was the first building in the town to be electrified by the new system. With the availability of electricity shops like that of the Cross brothers sprang up in the town as people who could afford it rushed to replace their old gas lighting systems with electricity. No doubt the Cross brothers did a good business and their name became well-known in the town in this field of work.

In 1904 George Cross married Alice Annie in Tunbridge Wells, who had been born in Tunbridge Wells in 1883, and by 1911 the couple had three children, all born in Tunbridge Wells between 1905 and 1910. At the time of the 1911 census, George’s younger brother Ernest Cross (born 1884 at St Lukes, London), was living with him and working in the town as a silversmith. Ernest had previously been working as a silversmith in London. Ernest had been married in 1909 and had one child, but for some reason they were not living with him in Tunbridge Wells. He later returned to London where he had a long career as a silversmith.

Not long after the marriage George and his brother Alfred vacated their shop in the pantiles and opened a new shop at 14 High Street,on the west side of the street ,just a few doors down from the Bedford Hotel at No. 2 High Street, where High Street meets Vale Road. What became of Alfred James Cross is a bit of a mystery, as no genealogical or business records, apart from the continued use of his name as G. and A.J. Cross Ltd up to 1969, were located. A view of the High Street is shown opposite looking north. Paynes jewellers shop at No. 37 is shown on the right where the clock is. The shop of the Cross brothers is beyond this on the left side.

Local directories and postcard views of the G. and A.J. Cross Ltd shop at 14 High Street show that the business continued until 1969. The business was frequently advertised in local newspapers, and showed that the company had expanded their operations as Radio Engineers.

In 1922 regular wireless broadcasts for entertainment began in the UK from the Marconi Research Centre 2MT at Writtle near Chelmsford, England. With the introduction of radio came the need for shops to sell, install and repair them, and so the Cross company started selling and repairing radios. The Cross bothers advertised that they were experts in the field and were “special agents for Pye, Marconi, and other makers of radios”. Shown opposite is view of a family listening to the wireless broadcasts during WW II. When television became available in the 1950’s they added the sale and repair of them to their business operations. They also advertised themselves as electric motor engineers.

The business had a long and successful history in the town, operating for some 69 years. You could not miss their shop on the High Street for mounted above the shop was a huge lighted sign “ Cross Electricians and Radio Engineers” that dominated the street scene.

Definitive information about the Cross brothers is elusive but it appears that George Cross may be the same George Cross who died in Hastings,Sussex in 1953. George’s son Edward Alfred George Cross, born in Tunbridge Wells in 1905, became involved in the business and took it over when his father retired. Edward A.G. Cross served in the Royal Navy Reserve as an Electrical Lieutenant. He married and raised a family the after the war he returned to Tunbridge Wells where he died in 1974. It is likely upon his retirement from the business that prompted the end of the business.

This article provides images of the business premises of the Cross brothers and presents information about the Cross family and the history of their business in Tunbridge Wells.

THE CROSS FAMILY-THE PRE TUNBRIDGE WELLS YEARS

George Cross was born 1876 at St Lukes, London and was one of at least ten children born to Alfred William Cross and Elizabeth Sarah Cross. His father worked most of his life in London repairing sewing machines.

The 1881 census, taken at 16 Radnor Street in St Lukes, London gave Alfred Cross as the head of the household. He had been born 1847 at St Luke,London and at the time of this census his occupation was given as “Engineer (E & M) sewing machines”. Living with him was his wife Elizabeth Sarah Cross, who had been born 1847 at St Lukes, London. Also in the premises were4 six of their children namely (1) Alfred James , born 1870 (2) Elizabeth Mary, born 1871 (3) Joseph, born 1873 (4) George, born 1876 (5) Frederick, born 1878 (6) Ada, born 1880. All of the children had been born in St Lukes, London and were attending school. By the time of the 1891 census, Alfred and his wife had added another four children to the family namely (7) Alice, born 1883 (8) Ernest, born 1884 (9) Maud, born 1886 (10) Arthur (1888-1939). Alfred’s work as a sewing machine mechanic must have been lucrative to support such a large family.

George seems to have received only a basis education, and with ten children in the family no doubt his parents could not afford to provide their children with a better education. How George became interested in the field of electricity and where he obtained training in this line of work was not determined. No doubt in his early years he worked for another gentleman in this business and learned it from the ground up.

The 1891 census, also taken at 16 Radnor Street in St Lukes, London gave Alfred William Cross as a “sewing machine mechanic worker”. With him was his wife Elizabeth and eight of their children including GEORGE CROSS, age 15, an errand boy, and his brother ERNEST CROSS, age 7 who was in was in school. George’s older brother, who would later join him the brothers electrical business, ALFRED JAMES CROSS, was not living with his parents and siblings at that time.

Sometime after 1891 and before 1903 George Cross and his brother Alfred James Cross moved to Tunbridge Wells and established their electrical shop at 27 Ye Pantiles.

THE CROSS BUSINESS IN TUNBRIDGE WELLS

As the exact date of the arrival of George Cross and his older brother Alfred James Cross in Tunbridge Wells is unknown to the researcher (sometime after 1891 but before 1903) I have arbitrarily wet the year 1900 as the date. There is no record of the business in the 1899 Kelly directory but appears in the 1903 Kelly as “ George Cross & Alfred James Cross, 27 Ye Pantiles, electric engineers”.

It is to be clarified that at the beginning of the 20th century the term “electrical engineer” was loosely used to describe someone with knowledge of electricity; someone who works as an electrician and or the seller of electrical lighting, appliances etc. This is not to be confused with  a professional electrical engineer we are familiar with today, who had received extensive technical education and training and who had graduated from university with a degree in Electrical Engineering.

Electricity was in general an exciting and to some a mystifying technology. Shown here are two images from Jean Mauldon’s book ‘Tunbridge Wells As It Was’ first published in 1977 but republished several times since then. The images show the Electrical Exhibition at the old Town Hall on Calverley Road  on October 11,1895. This event was held under the auspices of Sir David Lionel Salomons, who lived in the massive Broomhill Estate. At this time Salomons was Mayor of the town and served as Mayor for only the term of 1894-1895.  Salomons was among many things a man of science and he had electrified his own estate using an ingenious means of generating his own power and so it should come as no surprise that he was actively involved in seeing electricity brought to the masses. This event celebrated the coming of electricity to the town by way of a coal fired power station that had been erected in Upper Grosvenor Road, and not surprisingly the Town Hall was the first building in the town to be electrified. All of the main roads in the town were connected, and Mount Pleasant was lit by coloured lights to commemorate the event. At that time electricity was 6d a unit. The exhibition included many general trade stands, and a display of work by the Photographic Society, with which Salomons was also actively involved. This exhibition was attended by large crowds and the arrival of electricity in the town generated (no pun intended) a great deal of interest among business and the general public, and the availability of electricity resulted in the arrival of many business connected to this technology and it may well have been the reason that the Cross brothers seized upon the opportunity to establish their own business in the town in this field. People were greatly interested in converting their homes from gas to electric but like all things new there was a cost connected to it and not everyone could afford to make the conversion. For those who could afford it, the Cross brothers were ready, willing and able to provide their services. They sold at their Pantiles shop not only electric light fixtures and appliances but also served as electricians to install the necessary electrical wiring in premises throughout the town.

Shown above  are two photos showing the cooling towers on the site of the original power generating station of the Municipal Electricity Undertaking between Quarry Road and the Railway (Upper Grosvenor Road area of town). It had been established by the town council and inaugurated by the Mayor, Sir David Lionel Salomons on October 9,1895. After a reception at the Camden Hall, the Mayoress switched on the power and the local yeomanry escorted a procession to the town hall. The station remained in council ownership until 1947 and closed in 1969. This photo was taken about the time of the closure by local photographer Ron Glass who took many views of the town.  Show below this image is one from October 3,1928 showing the Municipal Electricity Undertaking’s entry in the parade and competition for commercial vehicles during Britain and Empire Week. Note the sign stating “ Be Modern Use Electricity” –just the kind of promotion that did the Cross brothers business a lot of good.

Shown opposite is map of the Pantiles from the booklet ‘The Pantiles Royal Tunbridge Wells’ by Philip Whitbourn which appeared in 2014 as “ Civic Society Occasional Paper No. 3”. No. 27 Pantiles was and is located on the Lower Walks, about half way down the Pantiles, directly opposite of Old Fish Market. As can be seen at the time this map was prepared in 2014 No 27 was the business premises of Yiju Antiques, a business that was not there when I visited the Pantiles in the summer of 2015. This booklet provides an interesting overview of the history of the Pantiles and can be purchased from the Royal Tunbridge Wells Civic Society. The Pantiles, always a favourite ,and much photographed commercial district of the town, has a fascinating history dating back to 1606 which has been written about extensively.

Shown above left is a photograph showing the part of the Pantiles in which this shop was located. Unfortunately no closeup view of the Cross brothers shop from the time they occupied it was found. The Cross brothers remained at this shop until about 1910 for at the time of the 1911 census they had taken up new premises at 14 High Street, a business location they remained at for some 59 years up to the time the business ended in 1969.

Shown opposite is a postcard view the High Street which on the right hand side can be seen the large sign of “Cross Electricians and Radio Engineers”, taken sometime in the 1920’s, which no doubt was installed as a replacement for an earlier sign when Radio became available in the 1920’s. Their sign, which of course was electrified’ dominated the street scene could be seen almost from one end of the High Street to the other when lit up. The shop was located on the west side of the High Street diagonally across from the Ferrari Italian Restaurant, who’s sign can also be seen in this image, and just a few doors down from the Bedford Hotel/Pub at the corner of Vale Road and the High Street (No. 2 High St). It was a large shop with living quarters above.

The 1911 census, taken at 14 High Street gave George Cross as an “electrical engineer, electrical light and power erector”. With him was his wife Alice Annie Cross, born 1883 in Tunbridge Wells who had married in Tunbridge Wells in 1904. Also present were their children (1) Edward Alfred George Cross, born 1905 (2) Marjorie Alice Cross, born 1908 (3) Irene Ada Cross, born 1910. All of the children were born in Tunbridge Wells. Also there was George’s younger brother Ernest Cross, born 1884 at St Lukes, London who was working as a silversmith. The census gave Ernest as married two years with one child but his wife and child were not living with him at this time, and most likely were back in London or off visiting family or friends. As I noted in the 1901 census, taken at 59 Broadway in Hackney, London Ernest was living with his parents and three siblings and working as a silversmith. It appears he did not remain long in Tunbridge Wells and returned to his wife and children in London. A marriage record for Ernest gave him as a silversmith of Birmingham when he married Maggie Ethel Roberts, a 28 year old spinster and daughter of Richard Havell Roberts (deceased) insurance broker. Ernest’s father Alfred was given as a deceased engineer. The marriage had taken place August 3,1908 at St George Tufnell Park, Islington.

The 1911 census recorded George Cross and his family living in premises of five rooms above the shop and that he and his wife had been married seven years and that all three of their children were still living.

What became of George’s brother Alfred James Cross, who had gone into business with is a mystery for no definitive records of any kind could be found for him after the 1903 directory listing for the two brothers at 27 Ye Pantiles. However his name continued in use throughout the existence of the business. Directories of 1913 to 1969 record the business as “ G. and A.J. Cross, electric motor engineers, 14 High Street, Tunbridge Wells”.

As noted earlier radios came available in the 1920’s. In 1922 regular wireless broadcasts for entertainment began in the UK from the Marconi Research Centre 2MT at Writtle near Chelmsford, England. With the introduction of radio came the need for shops to sell, install and repair them, and so the Cross company started selling and repairing radios. The Cross bothers advertised that they were experts in the field and were “special agents for Pye, Marconi, and other makers of radios”. A number of advertisments for the business ,to this effect ,appeared in the Kent & Sussex newspaper and the Sevenoaks Chronicle and Advertiser from April 10,1931 to July 8,1936 and in part referred to them “experts” and “for wireless you cannot do better than consult G and A.J. Cross Ltd, 14 High Street”.

When television became available in the 1950’s they added the sale and repair of them to their business operations. A photo of a British family watching television in 1958 is shown above . They also advertised themselves as electric motor engineers.

Shown opposite with text is a photo showing the Cross shop on the High Street at the time of the coronation of the present Queen, Elizabeth. As can be seen the there was lots of flags and bunting to be seen. The sign on the Cross shop stated they were “Electricians & Radio Engineers”.

One of the employees of G & A.J. Cross Ltd from 1959 to 1966 was Mervyn Hughes. Mervyn had been educated initially at Huntley’s school in Tunbridge Wells and then King Charles School and then 1959-1960 at Huntleys in He finished his education at West Kent College in Electrical, Electronics and Communications Engineering. He began work after finishing school with the Cross company on the High Street where he began an apprentice electrician. His CDV states while there he worked in all electrical installations; lift maintenance and installation of ac and dc motors, conveyor systems, lighting conductor systems, TV and aerial systems and door entry and security systems. His CDV also refers to working for Powell Cross Ltd, which must be connected to the Cross family. Mervyn went on to be a technical officer and director of other companies after his time with the Cross company and was given as semi-retired in 2007.  The Cross company in Tunbridge Wells hired several men like Mervyn Hughes to work for them and it was people like him with a good technical education that helped to advance the business.

George Cross had just one son, namely Edward Alfred George Cross, who had been born in Tunbridge Wells in 1905. At an early age Edward took an interest in his father’s business and when he had completed his education he joined the company.  During WW II Edward served from December 16,1940 onwards with the Royal Naval Reserve as a Temporary Electrical Lieutenant. After the war he returned to Tunbridge Wells; got married; and raised a family. When his father retired from business he took it over. It is believed that George Cross died in Hastings, Sussex in 1953. It is known that Edward Alfred George Cross died in Tunbridge We3lls in the 4th qtr of 1974. His death records state he had been born in Tunbridge Wells on February 8,1905.

There were several businesses in Tunbridge Wells engaged in the same or similar line of work but perhaps none more successful than that of the Cross brothers, their name becoming a household word, particularly in the early 1900’s when electricity was such a new technology.

 

THE WESTERN HO GUEST HOUSE

Written By: Edward James Gilbert-Thunder Bay, Ontario, Canada

Date: July 20,2016

PREAMBLE  

The Western Ho Guest House first came to my attention by way of a postcard view of it (image opposite) recently offered for sale on ebay. Thanks to the assistance of Chris Jones of the Civic Society its location was identified to be on the south east corner of Grove Hill Road and Sutherland Road, a building which I did not recognize even though on my trip to Tunbridge Wells in the summer of 2015 I was standing right beside it.

My friend Mrs Susan Prince and I were out on a walking trip that day to visit the former home of my family at 9 Grecian Road; the Grove Hill Lawn Bowling Club that my grandfather was a member of before emigrating to Canada in the early 1920’s; The Grove ; the Ivy Chimneys and other places on my list to see in that part of town. We eventually ended up at a little shop at the corner of Grove Hill Road and Sutherland Road and after a good look around Susan bought a lovely woolen blanket made in Ireland. One of the photos I took of the shop is shown below.

The shop carried a variety of things for the home, including a fine selection of decorative coloured glass ornaments that caught my eye as they shone brightly from the sunlight streaming into the shop window facing Sutherland Road. Since ladies seem to take longer than men to make a purchasing decision, I had some time to kill and took advantage of it by going outside to take a look at the buildings in the area. It’s not surprising, at least to me, that I could not identify the Westward Ho image from the postcard, even though I saw it first hand on my trip for I saw so many fine examples of Victorian architecture it would be impossible to remember them all, even though I took close to  600 photographs on my trip. My friend and I took photographs of the shop where our purchases were made but missed out getting one of the former Western Ho Guest House. Fortunately there are several of it to be found on the internet, which are presented in this article along with the postcard view of it which was the impetus of this report on the history of the building. The postcard image shown at the top of this article was commissioned to be made by Ernest Frederick Collins who ran the guest house. The image of the building is given on the left half of the front of the postcard, with the back being a typical divided back card with space to insert  a message and the address to which the card was to be sent. This card could not be dated for it was unused and no franked postage stamp affixed.

LOCATION AND DESCRIPTION

The former Western Ho Guest House is located at 26 Grove Hill Road, right on the south east corner of Grove Hill Road and Sutherland Road. This was one of a range of buildings constructed at the same time between Sutherland Road and Meadow Hill Road, numbered 26 to 36 even, with number 36 being identical to No, 26 except built in reverse plan. The 1911 census recorded that No. 26 was a building of 10 rooms.

Grove Hill Road, up to at least 1808 .was referred to on maps as “Turnpike Road to Woodsgate”. The 1738 map shows most of the land along it was devoid of buildings. By 1828 very little had changed with just a few scattered buildings in evidence. The map of 1832 shows additional buildings had been constructed including Edgar Terrace (later demolished in connection with the SER station and High Street Bridge) at the south east corner of Grove Hill Road and the High Street; a couple of buildings east of it and the residence of Dr Yeates further up Grove Hill Road. Maps of 1838/39 show little change in the area. The map of 1868 shows further development of the area but no sign of Sutherland Road being in existence, and nor the existence of what later would be the Western Ho Guest House and the range of buildings to the east of it. Nothing much had changed by the time a map of 1872 was produced. The map of 1899 however shows that by then a large number of buildings had been built on Grove Hill Road (including those numbered 26-36) and that Sutherland Road and other roads nearby had been constructed. When exactly No. 26 Grove Hill Road was built, and who designed and built it, was not established but it appears to have been constructed in the Victorian Style, built of brick with the typical bay windows of the time, circa 1880. The best description of the building is by way of the photographs I present in this article, modern views taken from different angles, which, when compared to the postcard view ,show that the exterior of the building has been little changed.

The building began as a single family home and appears as such at the time of the 1881 census when it was occupied by a widow of independent means and a few servants. It was still a private residence at the time of the 1891 census, and all census and directory listings for the building up to 1903 refer to it as simply 26 Grove Hill Road.

By 1911 this building came into the occupancy of Ernest Frederick Collins who turned the building into a Guest House and named it Western Ho. So where does the name Western Ho come from? Well, its roots lie from the name of the best- selling book of 1855 entitled  “Western Ho” by Charles Kingsley, which was set in the village of Bideford, Dover. The seaside village of Western Ho derives its name from the same book, being  located near Bideford. This little village had just a population of 2,112 at the time of the 2112 census. A hotel was constructed there called the Western Ho as were some adjacent villas. A postcard view of Western Ho in Bideford, Devon is shown opposite. Soon after the publication of Kingsley’s book the name Western Ho came into common use throughout England and a review of directories and other records from 1855 onwards shows that a number of hotels, guest houses, lodging houses etc adopted the name, and so it was that it came into use by Ernest Frederick Collins at his ‘Western Ho Guest House’ at 26 Grove Hill Road. The use of the name ‘Western Ho’for this building ended when Mr Collins died there in 1924.

After 1924 No. 26 Grove Hill Road continued in use as a lodging house and by 1936 was run by a Miss L. Rodkin. Later in the 20th century (post WW II) the building was converted into flats.

A review of Planning Authority files shows that in May 1975 an application was made for a change in use from residential to offices by Mr and Mrs Collins of 26 Grove Hill Road, but permission was refused.

In May 1990 Kingsdale Ltd made an application for 26 Grove Hill Road for conversion of 7 bedsits to four one bedroom flats. This application was approved, with the design work carried out by P.O. Payne architects of Bluebell Cottage, Down Lane, Frant.

In February 2008 an application was made regarding flat 26A for window replacements but was refused. The delegation report pertaining to this application stated “ This property is a 3 sty end of terrace dwelling which had frontage on Grove Hill Road and Sutherland Road. The property is separated into flats…”

In May 2015 a retrospective application was made by the occupant of 26D Grove Hill Road regarding the demolition and rebuilding of the brick walls at the rear, which was approved. The delegation report stated “ The wall bounds the cartilage of a semi-detached property, which is divided into flats. There is a rear garden to the property, the ground level for which is approximately one metre higher than the adjacent pavement. Ground levels on the road slope gently towards the rear of the site…The wall is in a dangerous state of repair…The rear section of this wall is to be demolished and rebuilt.

Today this building is still in use as flats and although the exterior of it still has the typical Victorian charm it had when first constructed, its interior of course has been significantly altered. Shown above is a map dated 1989 from the Planning Authority files on which the homes No. 26 to 36 are numbered.The building at No. 24 was, in 2015, the little shop my friend and I looked through, called Kotiki Interiors, that I referred to at the beginning of this article.

THE OCCUPANTS

A review of local directories, census records and other sources of information about this building were consulted, however, records for every year were not available. The information given in this section is therefore likely not complete and all dates given are approximate unless specifically referred to. The occupancy of the building was only investigated up to 1938.

1881-1882……..Mary Mcdonnell (1881 census, 1882 Kelly)

1891……………… John Huxtable (1891 census)

1899……………….Thomas T. Atkinson (1899 Kelly)

1911-1924…….. Ernest Frederick Collins (1911 census; 1913-1922 Kelly; 1924 Probate)

1936……………….. Miss L. Rodkin (1936 Kelly)

[A] MARY MCDONNELL

The 1881 census, taken at 26 Grove Hill Road gave Mary Mcdonnell as a 36 year old widow born at Tamworth, Lancashire, who was living there on private means from dividends. With her was her sister Sarah Johnson, a 45 year old single lady born in Bolton, Lancashire and living on private means. Also in the home were two domestic servants. At the time of this census an annuitant was living at No. 28; a civil servant with inland revenue at No. 24; a plumber at No. 23; a draper at No. 21 and a gardener at No. 25.

The 1882 Kelly gave the listing “ Mrs McDonnell, 26 Grove hill Road. This listing was in the private residents list and not the trade directory.

[B] JOHN HUXTABLE

The 1891 census, taken at 26 Grove Hill Road gave John Huxtable, age 48, born 1843 in Devonshire, who was employed as a tailor. Living with him was his wife Susannah, age 51, born 1840 in Devonshire and an 18 year old servant by the name of Anne Huxtable born 1873 in Tunbridge Wells.

[C] THOMAS T. ATKINS

Thomas was given in the 1899 Kelly under ‘private residents’. No other definitive information was found for him.

[D] ERNEST FREDERICK COLLINS

Ernest is found at ‘Westward Ho’ 26 Grove Hill Road in the 1911 census; the Kelly directories of 1913 and 1922 and in probate records of 1924.

Ernest was born 1866 in Frant, Sussex. He was baptised in Frant on July 29,1866 and given as the son of George and Ellen Collins.

The 1871 census, taken at Frant Street, Frant, Sussex gave George Collins as a bricklayer, born 1824 in Frant. With him was his wife Ellen, age 41, born 1830 on Wadhurst,Susssex and his children George Henry, age 7, born 1864 in Frant, a scholar; Ernest Frederick, born 1866 Frant, a scholar and Lucy M Collins,age 3, born 1868 in Frant.

The 1881 census, taken at High Street in St Mary Cray, Bromley, Kent, gave Ernest Frederick Collins as a grocer. He and several others were working in the grocers shop of Mary Hormer, age 36, who was a grocer and draper. Mary was there with seven of her children, one boarder (a draper); three grocers (of which Ernest was one) and two domestic servants. This shop was next to or close to the National School, based on the order in which the census was taken.

The 1891 census, taken at 16 Calverley Street, in Tunbridge Wells, gave George Collins as a retired builder. With him was his wife Ellen, given as born 1829 in Wadhurst, Sussex and working as a mantle maker. Also there was Ernest Frederick Collins who was working as a grocers assistant, and a daughter  Lucy M Collins, born 1868 in Frant, who like her mother was working as a mantle maker. A photo of Calverley Street is shown opposite.

In the 1st qtr of 1893 Ernest Frederick Collins married Susan Rebecca Yetman in Tunbridge Wells. Susan died in Tunbridge Wells in 1957 at the age of 86 and was buried in the Tunbridge Wells Borough Cemetery on October 2,1957.

The 1901 census, taken at 43 Church Road, Tunbridge Wells gave Ernest Frederick Collins as a fruit shop keeper at home. With him was his wife Susan, born 1871 in Tunbridge Wells, one boarder and one servant and their two children Flora E,M. Collins, born 1894 in Tunbridge Wells and Dorothy M.Y. Collins, born 1899 in Tunbridge Wells. The local directories of 1899 and 1903 also list Frederick as a fruiterer at 43 Church Road. Shown opposite is a postcard view of shops on Church Road by local photographer and postcard printer/publisher Harold H. Camburn. The shop on the immediate right has on the front “Post Office”. One of the other shops in this image was that of Frederick.

Sometime after 1901 and before 1911 Frederick took up residence at 26 Grove Hill Road and ran it as a guest house under the name of ‘Westward Ho’. The 1911 census, taken at Westward Ho, 26 Grove Hill Road gave the building as having 10 rooms. Living there was Ernest, stated to have been married 18 years with three children, and his wife and three children (Flora Evelyn May Collins, Ruth Mabel Jetman Collins and Lionel Ernest Henry Collins.  Ernest was given as a boarding house keeper. Also there was Ronald Alexander Lathrop Ditton Carroll Dempster, a 40 year old photographer and his wife Bessie Amelia, age 40 ; Joseph Lightfoot, a 36 year old photographer with his 36 year old wife Edna and a 45 year old milliner by the name of Clara Ayers, all of whom were staying at the Western Ho as guests.

The Kelly directories of 1913 and 1918 gave the listing “ Ernest Collins, apartments, 26 Grove Hill Road”.

Probate records gave Ernest Frederick Collins of the Western Ho Guest House, 26 Grove Hill Road when he died August 28.1924 in Tunbridge Wells. He was buried in the Tunbridge Wells Borough Cemetery on September 3,1924.

[E] MISS L. RUDKIN

Miss Rudkin is found at 26 Grove Hill Road in the 1936 Kelly directory but was gone by 1938. She is found as Miss L.M. Rudkin at 10 Park Road in Southborough in directories of 1944 to 1953. There is also a listing for a Miss Laundry Rodkin for the years 1932-1935 at 12 Wendel Road in London.

 

THE LIFE AND TIMES OF FRANCIS BOREHAM

Written By; Edward James Gilbert-Thunder Bay,Ontario,Canada

Date: August 30,2014

HIS EARLY LIFE            

Francis Boreham was born in the 1st qtr of 1846 in Kegworth,Leicestershire, and was baptised May 6,1846 at Kegworth.His parents were John Boreham (1803-1871) and Rachel Tunstall (1809-1860). He had two siblings, namely, John Boreham (1843-1895) and Rachel Boreham (1850-1924).

At the time of the 1851 census, taken at Tabley Superior, Cheshire, Francis was living with his parents and two siblings and three domestic servants.In 1854 John Boreham and his family moved to Wroxton where John worked on Lord Norths estate-Wroxton Abbey. A postcard view of Wroxton Abbey is shown above.

When the 1861 census was taken the family was residing at North Green in Wroxton,Oxfordshire. Wroxton is a village and civil parish in the north of Oxfordshire about 3 miles (5 km) west of Banbury.In 2001 the population was only 530.  The name “Wroxton” would become used by the family to later name their homes in Tunbridge Wells,in memory of the place where Francis grew up.Francis’s mother Rachel had passed away in 1860 .Present in the home in 1861 was John Boreham, widow,who was working as a head groom; Elizabeth Boreham,age 60, who was John’s widowed sister; and John’s children John,Francis and Rachel. Both of the sons were working as grooms with their father on the large estate of the Earl of Derby at Wroxton, near Banbury.

Probate records show that John Boreham senior died on June 12,1871 and was formerly of Kineton,Warwick but late of Stratton Audley,Oxford. John’s estate, valued at under 600 pounds was left in the hands of his executors John Boreham of Petworth,Sussex, in the service of Lord Leconfield, and Francis Boreham of Tunbridge Wells,Kent, Solicitors Managing clerk,the sons of the deceased.

HIS SIBLINGS            

John Boreham (1843-1895) was born in Mickleover,Derbyshire. He was baptised February 26,1843 at Mickleover. John was still living with his parents and siblings at the time of the 1871 census, and was working as a groom on Lorth Norths estate in Wroxton. In 1871 John was still single and at the time of the census he was living at Elcot Kintbury,Berkshire at the “Wilderness” where he worked as a “whipper in foxhounds. As noted in the 1871 probate of his father’s estate John was working in the service of Lord Leconfield at Petworth,Sussex.Shown opposite is a photo of Petworth House, the mansion of Lord Leconfield, which since 1947 has been in the hands of the National Trust. The Pentworth estate consisted of some 14,000 acres of land.When the 3rd Earl of Egremont died in 1837 he passed his estate to his illegitimate son, who in 1859 became Lord Leconfield, and it was for him that John Boreham worked.

Several others living there also worked in feeding,grooming and care of dogs. In the late 1870’s John married Emma, who was born 1849 at Warwickshire. He and his wife and two servants are found in the 1881 census at Dower Hill, Wycombe,Buckinghamshire where John is a huntsman. The 1891 census, taken at Iver,Buckinghamshire, records John as the publican of the Red Lion Hotel. Living with him was his wife Emma and his niece Louisa Hancock.

Probate records show that John Boreham was of the Red Lion Inn, licensed victualler, when he died October 29,1895. His 132 pound estate was left to his wife Emma. There is no record of the couple having any children.

Rachel Boreham, born 1850 at Walton,Derbyshire lived with her parents and siblings until at least 1861 in Wroxton,Oxfordshire. Rachel never married and persued a career as a school mistress.She had been baptised July 8,1849 at Walton Upon Trent,Derbyshire. The 1871 census, taken at the school house in Chetwode,Buckinghamshire shows Rachel as a school mistress. The 1881 census, taken at Finchley Park, records Rachel as a school mistress living as a boarder with Harriet Miller. The 1891 census, taken at 217 Park Road in Chapham,London gives Rachel working as a bakers assistant. The head of this household was Henrietta Boreham,age 42, living on private means, with Rachel given as her cousin. Henrietta’s niece Ella Surrell and brother John Boreham, age 43, were also in the home. The 1911 census, taken at 242 Wellmeadow Road, Hither Green, in Lewisham,London lists Rachel living on private means and single. She is living as a boarder with the Roote family. Rachel Boreham died 1924 in Thanet,Kent.

HIS LIFE IN TUNBRIDGE WELLS        

It is stated in the obituary of Francis Boreham “that he came to Tunbridge Wells from Wroxton, near Banbury,Oxfordshire in 1865,and worked for Messrs Stone,Simpson and Mason,solicitors for 59 years”.

As noted from his early life he had been living in Wroxton at the time of the 1861 census with his widowed father John; his aunt Elizabeth and his siblings John and Rachel.

Shown opposite is a family photo taken about 1901 in Tunbridge Wells. In the back row with the beard is Francis Boreham. Seated is his wife Fanny holding their youngest child Frederick. The other 9 children in the family are also shown.

On August 14,1869 Francis married Frances “Fanny” Usher(1845-1929) in Tunbridge Wells.The Northampton Mercury of August 28,1869 announced the marriage between the couple in Tunbridge Wells stating the above date and place of the marriage and that Mr Francis Boreham was late of Banbury and that Miss Fanny Usher was of Tunbridge Wells.

The couple had met at St John’s Church, where they later married.  Fanny  was one of several children born to William and Harriett Usher of Tunbridge Wells, where William Usher was the licensed victualler of the George Hotel at 29 Mount Ephraim. Details about the George Hotel and the Usher family can be found in my article ‘The George Hotel” dated August 27,2014. Shown opposite is a modern view of the former George Hotel, which today is known as the TN4 Bar.

The 1871 census, taken at the George Hotel, 29 Mount Ephraim lists William Usher as the head of the household. Wiilliam had been born 1813 at Ryarsh,Kent. Living with him was his wife Harriett F. Usher, born 1813 Malling,Kent and their two children Emily,age 20 and William,age 16. Also in the home were two servants and one boarder as well as three members of the Boreham family, namely Francis Boreham, age 25,son in law, born 1846 Kegworth, a solicitors managing clerk; his wife Fanny, age 25 and their son Frank William Boreham (1871-1959), born 1871 Tunbridge Wells. Frank William Boreham went on to have a distinguished career as a preacher and author, primarily in Australia.

Sometime after the 1871 census, Francis Boreham and his family took up residence at 3 Garden Road,Tunbridge Wells  and soon after the birth of their second son John Boreham (1872-1936) and before the birth of their third son William Usher Boreham (1875-1916) they moved from 2 Garden Road and took up residence in a new home, as the first occupants, on Upper Grosvenor Road, which Francis named Wroxton Lodge(shown below).Records indicate that the family took up residence at Wroxton Lodge in 1874. This image is from a Civic Society Newsletter showing Wroxton Lodge at 134 Upper Grosvenor Road taken during in the 1880’s. The home is located close to the junction with Dunston Road and the Grosvenor Bridge, although the bridge did not open until 1883.

Francis and Fanny went on to have a total of ten children namely (1) Frank William Boreham (1871-1959) (2) John Boreham (1872-1936) (3) William Usher Boreham (1875-1916) (4) Charles Tunstall Boreham (1877-1935) (5) Harry Bishop Boreham (1879-1951) (6) Albert Edgar Boreham (1881-1933) (7) Sarah Jessie Boreham (1882-1957) (8) Ernest Boreham (1884-1940) (9) Jeanie Boreham (1887-1963) (10) Frederick Boreham (1889-1966). All of the children were born in Tunbridge Wells. The family employed a general servant, who lived in the attic of Wroxton Lodge, and also part-time non-resident child minders.

Although further details about the children of Francis Boreham are given later, it is worth noting at this stage that his sons Frank, Albert and Frederick all entered the church. His son John became a draper/clothier; William Usher Boreham took employment with Lloyds Bank  and became a bank official; Charles Tunstall Boreham became an accountant; Harry Bishop Boreham became a postmaster; and Ernest became a school teacher. His daughter Sarah emigrated to Canada and her younger sister Jeanie remained in Tunbridge Wells to look after her parents. Frank William Boreham emigrated to Australia. Several decendents of this branch of the family can be found in England, Australia and Canada.

The 1881 census, taken at Wroxton Lodge recorded Francis Boreham as a solictors managing clerk. Living with him was his wife Fanny and their children Frank, John,William,Charles,Harry, and Albert, the eldest of which were attending school. Also in the home was Francis’s sister in law Emily Usher, age 30 and one servant.

The 1891 census, taken at Wroxton Lodge records the presence of Francis Boreham and his wife Fanny  and their children William, Charles,Harry,Albert,Sarah,Ernest,Jeanie and Frederick. Also in the home was one servant. The two eldest sons Frank William Boreham and John Boreham had left the family home to persue their careers.

The 1901 census, taken at Wroxton Lodge, 134 Upper Grosvenor Road recorded the presence of Francis and his wife Fanny and his children Charles, Sarah,Ernest,Jeanie and Frederick. Francis was still working as a solicitors managing clerk. The 1911 census, taken at the same address recorded Francis as a law clerk. Living with him was his wife Fanny and their daughter Sarah Jessie Boreham. Their residence was described as having 9 rooms.

Directory listings record Francis Boreham at 134 Upper Grosvenor Road throughout the period of 1903 to 1934. The 1874 Kelly just listed him at Upper Grosvenor Road and the 1882 Kelly had him as 86 Upper Grosvenor Road.  An account about the Boreham family and Wroxton Lodge provided to me by the Tunbridge Wells Reference Library stated that “other Boreham residences included Stephen’s Road, Beltring road,Hopwood and a second Wroxton Lodge at 142 St John’s Road, but these were not the residences of Francis Boreham.

Frances Fanny Boreham died in Tunbridge Wells on December 18,1929 and was buried in the Tunbridge Wells Borough Cemetery (photo opposite) on December 21st.

The Courier of February 5,1932 made reference to Francis Boreham as being the first secretary of the Association for the promotion of Tunbridge Wells.

Probate records gave Francis Boreham of 134 Upper Grosvenor Road died January 31,1932. The executors of his 3,496 pound estate were John Boreham,draper, Harry Bishop Boreham, postmaster, and Jeanie Boreham, spinster. All three of his executors were his children. Francis Boreham was buried in the Tunbridge Wells Borough Cemetery on February 3,1932.

After the death of Francis Boreham, his daughter Jeanie became the owner of Wroxton Lodge and she continued to live there until she sold it in 1944 to a Mrs Sarah Lusted and moved to Cornwall to care for her youngest brother Frederick, who became the  Archdeacon of Truro Cathedral and chaplain to George VI and the present Queen.

The Kent & Sussex Courier published the following obituary for Francis Boreham, and a photograph of him, but the quality of the image was too poor to include here. “We regret to record the death, which occurred on Sunday, his 86th birthday, of Mr Francis Boreham, of Wroxton Lodge, Upper Grosvenor Road,Tunbridge Wells, who, during the past sixty years had been prominently associated with many activities in the town. On their diamond wedding in August 1929, Mr and Mrs Broeham received a special message of congratulations from H.M. the King. Mr Boreham came to Tunbridge Wells from Wroxton, near Banbury, in 1865, and worked for Messrs Stone,Simpson and Mason, solicitors, for 59 years. It was on February 11th,1916, that Mr Boreham completed 50 years of service with that firm of solicitors, when to mark the occasion he was presented with a silver tea service, but he did not retire until nine years later. In 1924 he was the recipient of a cheque and letter of appreciation form the Guardians and Councillors of the Tonbridge Union and Rural District Council, in recognition of his services as secretary to the clerks of those bodies. Mr Boreham had always worked hard in the Conservative cause, and when the Tunbridge Wells Constitutional Club Company was formed by the old Conservatiive Association and the Working Men’s Association he was appointed secretary, and retained that office until the Company was wound up about three years ago. He was also secretary to the clubs from its formation until it was well established. He was the first secretary from its inception in 1873 of the Association for the Promotion of the Interests of Tunbridge Wells, the originator of the Tunbridge Wells Cricket Week, which was first held on the Common, and of which he was also formerly secretary.When the Association found that the Upper Cricket field on the Common was too small for first class matches they carried 16,000 loads of earth and enlarged the ground by one third through an extension on the lower side. The Association also carried on an extensive advertising campaign, and among other activities issued an album of local views to the foremost hotels in the United Kingdom and abroad, also sending copies to the principal trans-Atlantic liners. Another step of great importance was the erection of a railing around the Toad Rock (postcard view above),which was previously open to the ravages of sightseers. A keen churchman, Mr Boreham was a sidesman at St John’s for over 30 years,for many years being the senior sidesman and vice-chairman of the Parochial Church Council. Previous to that he held office as warden of Emmanuel Church (image opposite during demolition) for 21 years, acting as church secretary and treasurer. Mr Boreham has also been an active church worker, and has assisted in the various organisations connected with Emmanuel and St John’s Church (photo below). Mr Boreham’s only hobby was that of gardening. He was an enthusiastic gardener, and spent most of his time tending to his plants. Years ago he was a frequent exhibitor at local shows and won many awards. There were ten children by the marriage, eight boys and two girls, of whom one son died in 1916. The eldest son, the Rev. Dr. F.W. Boreham, a Baptist minister and author of many essays and sermons: his powerful preaching in Melbourne has been frequently broadcast. A second son is in business at Ashwood (sp) Bank,Worcester, and a third is an accountant in Melbourne.Another is a Postmaster, and a son and daughter are in Canada, the former at Toronto and the latter with her husband, Mr. John Guildford of Rusthall Grange, in Manitoba. The other two sons are headmaster of the Shelbourne Road Junior Technical Institute of the London County Council and a Church of England missionary respectively. The other daughter,Miss Boreham, has resided at home with her parents, and is also a prominent worker at St John’s Church. The son who died was connected with Lloyds Bank for 24 years, and was the first manager of the Pantiles Branch when it became a separate unit”. The rest of the article describes in detail the funeral of Francis Boreman which was officiated by Rev. Gordon M. Guiness at St John’s Church. “The service was coral with Mr Cuthbert H. Cronk at the organ…”



                                                
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