ALL ABOUT
TUNBRIDGE WELLS

Page 2

CAMBURN’S PHOTOGRAPHIC TRAVELS

 

Written By: Edward James Gilbert-Thunder Bay, Ontario, Canada

Date: March 2,2018

 

Harold Hawtry Camburn (1876-1956) was a photographer and postcard printer/ publisher from Tunbridge Wells. Initially he began his career in Tunbridge Wells with Percy Squire Lankester under the name of Lankester & Co in the early 1900’s. Within a few years he ended his partnership with Lankester and established his business on Grove Hill Road. While there he did studio photography but the bulk of his photographic work was the production of “Real Photograph” postcards, later changing to the “Wells Series” employing on the back of his postcards the image of a well with a rope and bucket suspended from the well head. Although Camburn served in the Mediterranean as an air mechanic during WW 1 he wife with an assistant carried on his business, although their activities most likely centered around serving Camburns customers with existing images. Shown opposite is one example of a Camburn postcard of Tunbridge Wells taken on the occasion of Shopping Week in 1923.

Camburn later moved to premises at 80 and 82 St John’s Road in Tunbridge Wells and during his long career in the town of some 40 years he produced thousands of postcards . A review of his output suggests he made at least 5,000 images with something in the order of 10,000 perhaps being more accurate.

Camburn produced postcard views of the villages and towns in the counties of Kent and Sussex, which formed the bulk of his images, but also in lesser quantity views in the counties of Surrey, Suffolk, Bedfordshire and Staffordshire. He even produced a series of colour postcards of the Orkney Islands for Mr Leonard of Kirkwell who ran a wholesale and retail stationers business there. Camburn of course did not take the Orkney photographs himself, but rather was hired by Mr Leonard to print the postcards for him. The Orkney Islands are located off the northern tip of Scotland, some 767 miles from Tunbridge Wells. Shown opposite is one example of a Camburn card for the Orkeny’s. These are the only colour postcards Camburn is known to have produced.

An interesting aspect of Camburn’s travels is that he rode about on a motorcycle with a sidecar in which he transported his photographic equipment. Camburn often used his motorcycle as a feature in the street scenes he photographed and examples of images with his motorcycle have been found in such places as Bletchingley, Surrey; Biddenden, Kent; Charing , Kent; Edenbridge, Kent,Crowborough and Riverhead, Kent.  Some of these images show the front of Camburn’s sidecar on which was painted his sign which read “ H.H. Camburn, photographer, Tunbridge Wells”.  Shown opposite is one example of a Camburn card showing his motorcycle.

A few examples of scenic views in which Camburn is shown himself exist, these being taken through the use of a timer on his camera. One in particular taken from Salvington Hill in Chanctonbury shows Camburn dressed in his usual long leather coat, looking back at the camera. This image is shown below.

A preliminary review of Camburns work shows to date that he produced images for 67 towns and villages in Kent; 99 in Sussex; 3 in Surrey; 3 in Suffolk; 14 in Staffordshire and 3 in Bedfordshire. The furthest he travelled was to the towns of Eccleshall in Staffordshire, a distance of some 200 miles from Tunbridge Wells. Postcards of his for Staffordshire include 13 other towns/villages near Eccleshall, all of them produced for one customer namely Edward John Hurlstone (1864-1939) who ran a stationers shop in Eccleshall. In Suffolk ,photographs of his have been found for Corton, Ipswich and Lowestoft being in the range of 95-145 miles from Tunbridge Wells. In Bedfordshire has been found to date his postcard views of Aspley Green, Woburn and Woburn Sands, some 100 miles from Tunbridge Wells.  Work  in cataloging all of Camburn's postcards is underway and no doubt more towns/villages will be found as the work progresses.

A review of his images of Kent show that the most distant places he produced photographs of was Thanet, some 63 miles from Tunbridge Wells but the bulk of his images were taken within a 25 mile range of his home base. The most populous places he photographed were Maidstone (107,000) followed by Tunbridge Wells (65,000) and Tonbridge (40,000) but it was noted that very few photographs were taken by him in large towns anywhere with the exception of Tunbridge Wells where some 300 images of his are known so far.  Large towns were saturated with postcard images produced by a large number of postcard publishes and so due to competition Camburn chose to service the smaller towns and villages  where he most often provided postcard views for certain clients who contracted with him. His clients were usually the local post office or the local stationers shop. In most cases the name of his client appears on the back of his postcards. In many cases town/village views by Camburn make up the bulk of the photographic record for that community, and for that reason his images are highly valued by local historical societies and researchers.

In Sussex, Camburn proved to be a stiff competitor to local postcard publishers . William Welfare of Withyham for example who produced postcards on his own initially gave up manufacturing his own cards in 1912 and thereafter sold cards supplied by Harold Camburn who was developing a “vast postcard empire covering most of Sussex and Kent as well as in some other counties” (Sussex postcard website). Ramsden Bros, who were wholesale stationers in Worthing sold postcards from many producers including those of Harold Camburn. Many fine examples of Worthing and area postcards by Camburn have been recorded. Articles about them by Antony Edmunds, who has also written a book about Worthing ,can be read on the internet.

As was the case in Kent, most of Camburn’s travels were within 25 miles from Tunbridge Wells but there were five towns noted to date that were over 50 miles away. As was the case in Kent, the bulk of Camburn’s output in Sussex was in small towns and villages. Of the most populous was Eastbourne (104,000)for which he produced few cards. Of other larger towns he produced cards for East Grinstead, Crowborough,Lancing, and Shoreham but again in relatively small series.  Camburn did not produce postcards for large seaside towns such as Brighton for competition was too stiff in them.  Shown above is a set of four graphs reflecting in visual form the results of a study the researcher recently completed to investigate the relationship between the number of towns served by Camburn relative to their distance to Tunbridge Wells and also the relationship between the number of towns served by him and their population.

















Further information about Harold Camburn can be found in my article ‘The Life and Times of Harold Camburn’ dated August 22,2011 which article was updated August 26,2015.  Camburn, in the opinion  of the researcher, was one of the best, if not the best, photographers Tunbridge Wells had in the first half of the 20th century. The quality of his images is largely due to a combination of his exceptional skills as a photographer; his use of the best photographic materials and best processing/printing equipment then available, that he bought from Tunbridge Wells inventor Ellis Graber.
 


HERBERT CECIL GAIN- GROCER AND TOWN COUNCILLOR

 
Written By: Edward James Gilbert-Thunder Bay, Ontario, Canada

Date: August 10,2017

OVERVIEW 

Herbert Cecil Gain was born 1864 at Porstsea Island, Hampshire, one of eleven children born to Herbert Horatio Gain (1829-1885), a paymaster with the Royal Navy, and Matilda Purdie Goodenough (1838-1917).

At the time of the 1871 census Herbert was living with his parents and four siblings at Hanshead Villa in Portsea and was attending school.

Herbert began his working career as a grocers assistant, and was working as such at the time of the 1881 census at the grocers shop of Edgar William Botting on the High Street in Storrington, Sussex.

At the time of the 1891 census Herbert was working as a grocers manager in Harrow,Middlesesx.

In 1893 he married Florence Harriett Sheldon, who had been born 1869 in Islington, Middlesex. She was one of five children born to George Sheldon (1831-1909), an electrotype printer, and Harriett Sheldon, nee Taylor (1829-1916). In the years leading up to her marriage she lived with her parents and siblings and in 1891 was living in Harrow, Middlesex.

After the marriage Herbert and his wife took up residence in Tunbridge Wells, where Herbert opened a grocers shop at the 5 Ways intersection. His shop is found listed in directories there from 1894 to 1903 and during that time Herbert served as a Councillor for the North Ward. He was also a member of the Freemasons, having joined the Pantiles Lodge October 24,1894. He was also a member of the Tunbridge Wells Tradesmen’s Association.

Herbert and his wife Florence had five children between 1894 and 1905. The eldest three children Florence Alice Gain (born 1894); Herbert Guy Goodenough Gain (born 1895) and Cecil Harry Goodenough Gain (born 1899) were all born in Tunbridge Wells.

In 1903 Herbert left Tunbridge Wells and emmigrated to South Africa where he and his wife had a daughter Eva Joan Gain (born 1905) and a son born in 1907.

The activities of the family while in Tunbridge Wells and later in South Africa make for interesting reading, the details of which are given in this article.

THE GAIN FAMILY BEFORE 1894 

Herbert Cecil Gain was born September 15,1864 at Porstsea Island, Hampshire, one of eleven children born to Herbert Horatio Gain (1829-1885), a paymaster with the Royal Navy, and Matilda Purdie Goodenough (1838-1917). His birth was registered at Porsea Island in the 4th qtr of 1864. He was baptised October 7,1864 at St Mary’s Church in Porsea, Hampshire. Shown below left is a postcard view of Portsea and to the right is a postcard view of St Mary’s Church.









The 1871 census taken at Hanshead Villa in Portsea, Hampshire gave Herbert attending school. He was living with his father Herbert, who had been born in Porstea and was working as a “paymaster Royal Navy on active list”. His mother Matilda was also there and had been born in Smyina, Surrey. Also there were four of Herbert’s siblings and one domestic servant.

In about 1880 Herbert left the family home. At the time of the 1881 census Herbert was found at the High Street grocers shop of Edger William Botting in Storrington, Sussex (image opposite) where Herbert was working as a grocers assistant.

The 1891 census, taken at  Harrow, Middlesex, Herbert was working as a grocers manager and living as a lodger with Amelia Stonbrook, a lady of independent means and her granddaughter; two other visitors and two domestic servants.

In April 1893 Herbert married Florence Harriet Sheldon in Middlesex. Florence had been born 1869 in Islington, Highbury, London and was one of five children born to George Sheldon (1831-1909) and Harriet Sheldon, nee Taylor (1829-1916). At the time of the 1871 and 1881 census, Florence was living with her parents and siblings at Islington, and was attending school.  When the 1881 census was taken Florence’s father was working as an electrotype printer; her 26 year old brother George was an bookbinder. Her brother Henry,age 23, was working as an electrotype bank note printer, and her 20 year old brother William was a clerk. The family at that time were living at 3 Grace Street in Islington. Florence’s father died at Hendon, Middlesex in the 3rd qtr of 1909 and her mother died at the same place in the 1st qtr of 1916.

After the marriage Herbert and his wife moved to Tunbridge Wells in 1894 where they began to raise a family. Details of the Gain family during the time they lived and worked in Tunbridge Wells is given in the next section of this article.

THE GAIN FAMILY IN TUNBRIDGE WELLS

Herbert Cecil Gain and his wife Florence Harriet Gain took up residence in Tunbridge Wells in 1894.

While living in Tunbridge Wells the couple had three children namely (1) Florence Alice Gain, born 1894 (2) Herbert Guy Goodenough Gain, born 1895 (3) Cecila Harry Goodenough Gain, born 1899. The couple would later have two more children after the family emmigrated to South Africa in 1903 namely (1) Eva Joan Gain, born 1903 (2) an unnamed son born circa 1905. Further details about the children are given in the last section of this article.

When Herbert settled in Tunbridge Wells he opened a grocers shop on the south-west corner of the 5 Ways intersection. A photograph of his shop ,from Peltons 1896 guide,is shown above, and was listed in local directories from 1894 to 1903 as being at 5 Ways. The sign on his shop showed that in addition to selling groceries he also sold wine and spirits.

Shown opposite is a 1909 os map on which highlighted in red is the location of Herbert’s shop. Although his shop was listed in directories as being at 1  Grosvenor Road  or 5 Ways a more precise description of his shop would be the south-west corner of Mount Pleasant Road and Lime Hill Road. Five Ways was the busiest commercial district of the town and in the 1930’s became the first intersection in the town to have traffic lights. Herbert no doubt did a thriving business from this location.

 Shown opposite is a photo of 5 ways taken in 1963 in which Boots Chemists occupied the former grocers shop of Mr. Gain. Shown below are two postcard views of the 5 Ways intersection in which the building once occupied by Herbert can be seen. These images date from the 1940’s. Details about Boots Chemists can be found in my article ‘ Boots Cash Chemists Ltd” dated March 20,2012 in which their shops in the Pantiles and at 73 Mount Pleasant Road are described and shown.











The records of the Freemasons show that Herbert was a grocer when he was initiated October 24,1894 and entered the Pantiles Lodge. Several references to Herbert with the Freemasons were found in the Kent & Sussex Courier such as that of February 6,1903 regarding a “Masonic Gathering at Tunbridge Wells”. He is also referred to in a number of articles in the Courier about his membership and activities with the Tunbridge Wells Tradesmen’s Association from 1894 to 1903. A number of advertisments regarding the products sold in his grocers shop and prices charged also appeared in the Courier over the same period.

References in the Courier and in Kelly’s directories were also found from 1894 to 1903 regarding North Ward elections in which he ran as a candidate and about his service as a councillor on town council from 1894 until his resignation in 1903. In many of these articles details are given about his charitable work; fundraising activities and his involvement in the “Aged Poor Dinner” of January 1896 and February 1900 and the “Coronation Dinner to Old People” in July 1902. It appears from these articles that Herbert did much good work for the North Ward and for the town in general.  The Courier also referred to Herbert in connection with the Chamber of Commerce in 1901.  Mention was also made in the Courier of the involvement of Herbert and his wife in the early 1900’s with entertainments at the Tonbridge Union. The Courier of April 3,1903 referred to the “Athletic Ground Company” and the resignation from it by “H.C. Gain”.

The ‘Chemist and Druggist’ of March 28,1896 referred to “Mr. H.C. Gain” in connection with the provision of arrowroot and other items by contract with certain unions.  The Courier of December 16,1898 gave the following “ The Grocers- At the other end of the town Mr H.C. Gain, the Five Ways is going to the fore with his Christmas Show. Every possible requirement the customers will be found catered for and the more can wish for gain is that will sell his large and miscellaneous stock”.

The London Gazette of April 25,1899 gave notice that” the partnership between Sidney Whiteman, Felix Wild, and Herbert Cecil Gain, carrying on business as condiment merchants in Tunbridge Wells under the style of S. Whiteman and Company was dissolved by mutual consent as of December 25,1898. All debts etc to be received by Herbert Cecil Gain”.

The departure of Herbert and his family from Tunbridge Wells and his immigration to South Africa was referred to in the Kent & Sussex Courier of January 30,1903 in which it was stated in part that “Councillor H.C. Gain gave a most interesting account of his recent visit to South Africa……..”. The Courier of February 3,1903 reported “Councillor Gains Fairwell-At the morning town council meeting Mr Councillor H.C. Gain’s resignation was received, an event which had been anticipated in view of Mr Gain’s almost immediate departure for South Africa….” . The Courier of February 6,1903 reported that “Mr. H.C. Gain spoke before the Tunbridge Wells Farmers Club about his South African experience…” . The 1903 Kelly directory recorded that the Gain family were living in a fine home on Upper Grosvenor Road but did not give the precise address of the residence.

Although Herbert and his family left Tunbridge Wells travel records shown him travelling either alone or with his family back and forth between South Africa and England and an article in the Courier of October 6,1905 mentions him being in Tunbridge Wells where he gave a talk on his experiences in South Africa.

THE GAIN FAMILY IN SOUTH AFRICA

I begin my account of the family in South Africa with a summary of travel records. On January 17,1903 Herbert departed from South Africa on the WALMER CASTLE  and arrived at Southampton. On this trip he was travelling alone and at that time still a resident of Tunbridge Wells. As noted in the previous section he gave a talk about his experiences in South Africa in the Courier of January 30,1903.

Herbert and his wife Florence and children Florence, Herbert and Cecil departed from Delogoa Bay, Mozambique and arrived at Southampton August 2,1905 on the WALMER CASTLE.

Mrs Florence Harriet Gain and her children Florence, Herbert, Cecil and Eva departed from Cape Town South Africa on the GALICIAN and arrived at Southampton August 11,1910.

Herbert Cecil Gain departed from Durban, South Africa and arrived at Southampton on the BALMORAL CASTLE August 24,1912. He was travelling alone.

Herbert Cecil Gain departed from Durban South Africa and arrived June 30,1919 at Plymouth on the KENIWORTH CASTLE and was given with the occupation of “merchant”. He gave South Africa as the place of his permanent address.

Florence Harriett Gain returned to England in 1937, having departed from Cape Town. She ended up in Portishead, Bristol but left again for South Africa on November 13,1937.

The National Archives of South Africa hold five items in their collection relating to Herbert Cecil Gain namely (1) The death of Herbert Cecil Gain in South Africa 1923 and refers to his surviving spouse Florence Harriett Gain (2) Ex-Parte application for Herbert Cecil Gain dated 1909 (3) Opposed Application-Strong And Trowbridge Company versus Herbert Cecil Gain 1910 (4) Opposed Application-Herbert Cecil Gain versus Abe Berman 1912 (5) Opposed Application-Herbert Cecil Gain versus Napthal Hertz 1913.

The Abe Berman referred to above is written about in a book (‘Plumes: Ostrich feathers, Jews…’)about the feather industry in South Africa.  Abe (Abraham)was a Jewish feather merchant, one of the few still in this business after the feather crash of 1914. Napthal Hertz was also a Jewish merchant in South Africa. Information about the Trowbridge Company was not found.

The Transvaal Estate Death Index recorded that Herbert Cecil Gain died in South Africa in 1923. The book ‘South Africa Who’s Who of 1908’ recorded “Herbert Cecil Gain born September 15,1864 Southsea, Hampshire, son of Herbert Horatio gain; married Florence Harriett Sheldon. He was a business proprietor. His wife was of Harrow-on-Hill,London and he had four children”.He was survived by his wife who died in South Africa sometime after 1937. The reference to “four children” is perhaps in reference to “surviving children” for it is known that his last child (the 5th) was born in South Africa in 1907 and so perhaps the child died before 1908.

THE CHILDREN OF HERBERT CECIL GAIN

The four surviving children born to Herbert Cecil Gain and his wife Florence  were (1) Florence Alice Gain, born in Tunbridge Wells in 1894 (2) Herbert Guy Goodenough Gain, born 1895 in Tunbridge Wells (3) Cecil Harry Goodenough Gain, born 1899 in Tunbridge Wells (4) Eva Joan Gain, born 1905 in South Africa.. In this section I provide some brief information about the two sons.

[1] HERBERT GUY GOODENOUGH GAIN

Herbert was born in Tunbridge Wells in the 4th qtr of 1895 and lived with his parents and siblings in a fine home on Upper Grosvenor Road. He attended a local school. He left Tunbridge Wells in 1903 when his parent and siblings emmigrated to South Africa.

The 1911 census, taken at Fulhan, London gave Herbert as a boarder at Colet House, Gliddens Road, West Kensington where he was attending St Paul’s School . The headmaster of the school was Leonard Dart Wainwright. There were about 28 pupils at this school.

In 1914 Herbert was a Forester in Transvaal.

He served during WW 1 with the Royal Flying Corp and survived the war.

His first wife was Elizabeth Dowling.  His second wife was Jennue Lewis Gain, with whom he had a son Robert Gordon Goodenough Gain (1921-1941).

On August 27,1924 he married Helen Annie Duggan, a spinster (born 1899) at St Augustines Church, Transvaal, South Africa (photo above). Herbert was given as a 28 year old widower with the occupation of commercial traveller. Herbert died in South Africa.

Herbert’s son Robert Gordon Goodenough Gain served and was killed during WW II. The South African War Graves Project recorded that he was a sergeant with the 266 Squadron (Rhodesia) Royal Air Force Volunteer Reserve and died October 29,1941 in England. He was given as the son of Herbert Guy Goodenough Gain and Jennie Lewis Gain, of Arctury’s, Southern Rhodesia. He was born April 28,1921 at Windhoek, and entered Milner House in January 1925. He was interested in dramatics and did good work for his House. He left in October 1938, and attested in the RAF on July 5,1940, and proceeded to England for training. Before the war he was in the Geological Survey Department, Salisbury. On Plumtree School Roll of Honour. He was killed near Grantham when his spitfire was destroyed after it flew into the ground in a blizzard, whilst in a flight from Nottingham to Wottering. He was buried at the Grantham Cemetery, Lincolnshire plot 104 section 17 row L grave 11. A photo of his headstone can be seen on the South African War Graves Project Website. Shown above is a photo of the cemetery; the 266 Squadron and the badge of the RAF Eagles of Rhodesia. The book ‘A Pride of Eagles-A History of the Rhodesian Air Force’ (2015) mentions him.

[2]CECIL GUY GOODENOUGH GAIN (1899-1926)

Cecil was born in Tunbridge Wells in 1899 and was the second eldest son. He lived in Tunbridge Wells with his parents and siblings until the family emigrated to South Africa in 1903.

A 1910 passenger list gave him travelling with his parents and sister Eva from South Africa , arriving in Southampton August 11,1910 on the ship GALICIAN. 

The 1911 census, taken at Hove, Sussex gave him as a pupil at a boys school (Lancing College).

After finishing school he returned to South Africa where he died in  Transvaal in  1926.


HARRIET MAYBLIN-A TUNBRIDGE WELLS NURSE

 

Written By: Edward James Gilbert-Thunder Bay, Ontario, Canada

Date: July 31,2017

OVERVIEW 

Harriet Mayblin (1864-1940) was born in Belper, Derbyshire, one of three children born to locomotive driver John Mayblin (1839-1929). John Mayblin had been married twice. His first marriage(in 1861) was to Ann Anthony (1839-1865) and the only child born from this marriage was Harriet. John’s second marriage (in 1867) was to Sarah Peace (1841-1900) with whom he had a daughter Annie Matilda Mayblin (1868-1891) and two sons  namely Samuel Ernest Mayblin (1875-1932) and John Joseph Mayblin (1872-1951).

At the time of the 1871 census Harriet was living with her father and his second wife Sarah in Derbyshire where at that time Harriet was attending school.

At the time of the 1881 census Harriet was living in Cumberland with her father and his second wife and two brothers. Harriet at that time had no occupation.

The records of King’s College London notes that Harriet attended the Florence Nightingale Faculty of Nursing, an academic faculty within King’s College, where she received training as a nurse. Their records gave her qualifications as being a certificate from the Crumpsall Infirmary in Manchester 1884-1885 and also from the Tunbridge Wells Nursing Institution 1887-1887and that she became a member of the British Nurses Association. The UK & Ireland Nursing Register for 1898 listed her at the Nursing Institute on Grosvenor Road, Tunbridge Wells and that she had been a private nurse since 1885.

Harriet Mayblin settled in Tunbridge Wells in 1885 and upon completing her training she worked as a professional nurse in the town. At the time of the 1891 census, taken at 24 London Road, also known as Scotsford House, a boys commercial school run by Frederick William Ellis, Harriet was living there as a lodger with the occupation of profession nurse (sick) along with another professional nurse (Emily N. Price born 1853 Lambeth). Also there was Frederick William Ellis; two of his children and one domestic servant and her son.

At the time of the 1901 census Harriet was living in a nice semi-detached home at 17 Culverden Park Road and by the time of the 1911 census she had taken up residence in a semi-detached home at 60
Culverden Park Road where she lived in premises of 6 rooms with one general servant. Although Harriet was an attractive young lady she never married and devoted her life to her nursing career and the care of others. The 1911 census recorded that she was a “retired sick nurse”.

She lived on Culverden Park Road for several years but later took up residence in Southborough. She died at ‘Elmslee’ a quaint 2 sty red brick and stucco semi-detached home at 1 West Park Avenue, on June 24,1940 at age of 76. She was cremated at the Kent & Sussex Crematorium and her urn was buried in the Tunbridge Wells Borough Cemetery on June 27th. The funeral arrangements were made by her two brothers. When she died she left an estate valued at 870 pounds and appointed her brother John Joseph Mayblin,newsagent, as her executor as well as Arthur Reginald Kelsey,brewer, of the well- known local brewery family of Kelsey’s Culverden Brewery on St John’s Road.  

In this article I report on her family life, and her training and work as a nurse. Shown above is a photograph stated to be of Harriet taken in Tunbridge Wells, probably around the time she first came to the town in 1885 when she was 21 years old.

HER LIFE UP TO 1881

Harriet Mayblin’s birth was registered in the 1st qtr of 1864 at Belper, Derbyshire. She was baptised August 7,1864 at Ripley, Derbyshire and given as the daughter of John Mayblin (1839-1929) and Ann Mayblin, nee Anthony (1839-1865).

John Mayblin (photo opposite)was a locomotive driver who had been born in Belper,Derbyshire where he lived most of his life. He was one of for children born to John Mayblin (1804-1871) and Martha Mayblin, nee Sherlock (1807-1871).

John Mayblin’s first marriage was in the 2nd qtr of 1861 at St Peter, Leeds, Yorkshire, to Ann Anthony (1839-1865) and with her had just the one child, namely Harriet in 1864. Ann had been born in Leeds and died in Derbyshire only a few months after her daughter’s birth, from unknown causes.

John Mayblin’s second marriage was on March 23,1867 at Shardlow, Derbyshire to Sarah Peace (1841-1900).With Sarah John had a daughter Annie Matilda Mayblin (1868-1891) and two sons  namely Samuel Ernest Mayblin (1875-1932) and John Joseph Mayblin (1872-1951). Both sons were born in Derbyshire. A photo of John Joseph Mayblin is shown opposite. Both sons got married and raised families but neither of them were ever residents of Tunbridge Wells, and for that reason no further information is given about them.

Sarah Peace had been born 1841 at Rolleston, Staffordshire and died 1900 in Carlisle. She was one of five children born to Joseph Green Peace (1804-1886) and Sarah Peace, nee Dolman (1804-1886).

The 1871 census, taken at Maltby Street at Long Eaton, Derbyshire gave John Mayblin as an engine driver. With him was his second wife Sarah, born 1841 at Rolaston, Staffordshire. Also there was his daughter Harriet who was attending school and his daughter Annie Matilda Mayblin (1868-1891) also attending school. His nephew Frederick Mayblin, born 1866 in Derbyshire was also living there and attending school.

The 1881 census, taken at Boundary Row, St Cuthbert Without Blackwell Low, Cumbria, gave John Mayblin as a “engine driver locomotive”. With him was his second wife Sarah; his daughter Harriet of no occupation;and his two sons John Joseph Mayblin and Samuel Ernest Mayblin, both of whom were attending school.

It is expected that Harriet continued to live with her parents until she left home and moved to London to obtain her training as a nurse, initially at  the Florence Nightingale Faculty of Nursing, an academic faculty within King’s College.

Probate records for Harriet’s father John Mayblin gave him of 44 Boundary Road, Carlisle when he died April 4,1929. The executor of his 429 pound estate was his son John Joseph Mayblin, mechanic.

THE FLORENCE NIGHTINGALE FACULTY OF NURSING

The reference to Harriet attending this facility comes from the records of King’s College and was an academic faculty within King’s College devoted to the training of nurses and is recorded as being the world’s first nursing school to be continuously connected to a fully serving hospital and medical school (St Thomas Hospital). Details about the history of this facility can be found on such websites as Wikepedia. The facility was established July 9,1860 by Florence Nightingale (photo opposite), the founder of modern nursing. Between 1860 and 1903 the school certified 1,907 nurses as having had one year’s training. Many of the trainess went on to be matrons or superintendents of nursing. The students of the school normally lived in-house in private rooms with a common room for lounge or socials was provided in the hospital’s special area.The students attended their classes at the hospital with only about 20-30 students accepted each year. Upon completion of the training the students would receive a certain small amount of money plus a placement in a home or instution. In Harriet’s case she next went to the Crumpsall Infirmary in Manchester, details of which are given in the next section. Shown above is an interior  view of the Florence Nightingale facility.

THE CRUMPSALL INFIRMARY
 
The records of Kings College note that Harriet obtained a nursing certificate while at the Crumpsall Infirmary in Manchester 1884-1885. The Uk & Ireland Nursing Register of 1890 and 1898 record that Harriet received one year’s training from 1884-1885 at the Crumpsall Infirmary.

From the website of Springfield Hospital, Crumpsall, is the following historical account “  Springfield Hospital was originally a workhouse, but was gradually transformed into a psychiatric hospital. The old Manchester Workhouse had been founded in Bridge Street in 1792. The new Manchester Workhouse opened in Crumpsall in 1858. The Workhouse building, called Park House, later became Springfield Hospital. The Workhouse catered for paupers, including those who were able to work, as well as orphans, the elderly and 'lunatics'. By 1860, there were 116 inmates of unsound mind. In 1876, Crumpsall Infirmary was built next to the Workhouse, and the Workhouse gradually ceased to cater for able-bodied paupers. At the turn of century, Manchester Board of Guardians began specialist provision for epileptics, orphans and 'feeble minded children', leaving 'the elderly and adult inmates of unsound mind in the workhouse'. Crumpsall Institute passed many patients on to County Mental Hospitals, but provided institutional care for patients with a wide variety of psychiatric problems. After the reorganisation of poor law unions in Manchester in 1915, Manchester Workhouse changed its name to the less stigmatised Crumpsall Institute, and in 1930 the Institute ceased to be a workhouse and instead provided care for psychiatric patients. With control being taken by Manchester Corporation, the Infirmary and Institute became separately managed institutions. In 1939 the name of the Institute was changed to Park House, due to the stigma attached to the word 'Institute'. With the advent of the NHS, the hospital changed its name yet again, this time to Springfield Hospital, and it joined up with Swinton. By this time there were 883 patients, though this figure would decrease rapidly. The 1940s saw the first psychiatric social worker at Springfield and the first medical superintendent started work in 1950s. There were significant improvements in the 1960s, partly due to Mental Health Act of 1959. The Hospital began to offer treatment rather than incarceration. In 1972, Springfield Hospital was integrated with Delaunays Hospital and Crumpsall Infirmary and became the Psychiatric Department of the North Manchester General Hospital. The department closed in 1995 and the original building was demolished to be replaced with a new Mental Health Unit, aptly named Park House.”

Shown above is a postcard view of the Crumpsall Infirmary dated 1906 along with an interior view showing nurses and patients.

HER LIFE AND CAREER IN TUNBRIDGE WELLS

The records of King’s college notes under the heading of “qualifications” that Harriet was at the Tunbridge Wells Nursing Institution from 1885 to 1887. The Nursing Record of November 20,1890 and that of 1898 record confirm this but added that the Nursing Institution in Tunbridge Wells was on Grosvenor Road and that Harriet had been a private nurse since 1885.

The Kent Nursing Institute had been established in Tunbridge Wells in 1875. Burdett’s 1905 issue lists the Kent Nursing Institute as being established in 1875 as a private nursing service.It was like the one established by Eva Luckes at the London Hospital in 1886 in part to raise much needed income for the London Hospital. The institute in Tunbridge Wells also did charitable work. Funding for its operation were from charitable donations, regular subscriptions and one off payments for care as required. From 1877, Queen Victoria’s Jubilee Institute (later the Queens Nursing Institute) became the central post-qualification district nurse training and distribution point for district nurses across England and Wales.District Nursing Associations such as the Kent Nursing Institution would affiliate the QVIJN who would then provide professional oversight of their work through an area superintendent and with regular inspections. In 1903 the Kent Institute was still at #11 Crescent Road where Miss Mottram was the superintendant. After this the building is recorded as the Tunbridge Wells District Nursing Association (Queen Victoria Memorial Home).During the period of 1911-1919 is was referred to as the Tunbridge Wells District Nursing Association. During WW 1 the institute had 32 beds for the treatment of soldiers and additional beds for civilians. One nurse of considerable accomplishments who worked for the Kent Nursing Institute was Lilian Teasdale who I wrote about in my article ‘ The Life and Times of Lilian Teasdale’ dated September 2,2013.

 














The 1891 Kelly directory gave the following listings (1) Tunbridge Wells General Hospital-Grosvenor Road (photo above left) (2) Kent Nursing Institution 29 Monson Road (3) Kent Nursing Institution for hospital trained nurses 20 Monson Road. Shown above right is a postcard dated 1906 showing the Kent Nursing Institution in Mount Sion at Jerrington House. A detailed history of Jerrington House can be found in the book ‘A History of Mount Sion’ by Roger Farthing (2003). He states that the Kent Nursing Institution was at Jerrington House from 1905 until 1939.

It is my understanding that nurses would register with the nursing institution and would be assigned nursing duties in the community. The reference to the nursing institution being on Grosvenor Road during Harriet’s time would seem to suggest it was part of the General Hospital Complex on Grosvenor Road.

The 1891 census, taken at Scotsford House, 24 London Road is an interesting one for Scotsford House was the site of a commercial boys school run by Frederick William Ellis, who I wrote about in my article ‘ Frederick William Ellis-Schoolmaster of Scotford House’ dated July 30,2017. In this census record is noted the presence of Frederick William Ellis, a private schoolmaster born 1849 in Alfriston, Sussex and his 14 year old daughter Emma and 8 year old son Arthur. Also there was one domestic servant and her young son. But of particular interest is that there were two lodgers there, namely professional nurse Emily N. Price, born 1853 in Lambeth, and professional nurse (sick) Harriet Mayblin. Both nurses were identified as “neither employer or employed”indicating that Harriet was a private nurse, and had been one since 1885. Why she would be living as a lodger in a boys commercial school with another nurse is rather strange particularly since the boys who attended the school did not live on the premises. No information was found connecting her in a working capacity with the school. Shown above is a modern photograph of 24 and 26 London Road, a large multi-sty building,with No. 24 shown on the left. The building today has two shops at street level with flats above.

The 1901 census, taken at 17 Culverden Park Road  gave Harriet as a spinster and with her was just one domestic servant. Her occupation was given as “professional nurse”.  Culverden Park Road was part of a large residential development west of St John’s Road and runs north-south off Culverden Down and Culverden Park. No. 17 ,which still exists, is a nice semi-detached residence located on the west side of the road at its southern end.

The 1911 census, taken at 60 Culverden Park Road gave Harriet as a “retired sick nurse”. With her was one general servant. This home was described in the census as being 6 rooms. The census noted that Harriet had never been married. A photograph of this residence is shown opposite.

Harriet continued to live at 60 Culverden Park Road for a number of years but later took up residence in Southborough. Probate records gave Harriet Mayblin of ‘Elmslee’ 1 West Park Avenue, Southborough and that she was a spinster who died June 24,1940. The executors of her 870 pound estate were Arthur Reginald Kelsey, brewer, and her brother John Joseph Mayblin, newsagent.

Harriet was cremated at the Kent & Sussex Crematorium and her urn was buried in the Tunbridge Wells Borough Cemetery on June 27th. The funeral arrangements were taken care of by her two brothers.

PACE AND MANN -TUNBRIDGE WELLS PHOTOGRAPHERS

 

Written By: Edward James Gilbert-Thunder Bay, Ontario, Canada

Date: April 7,2016

OVERVIEW 

The Pace family have been residents of Tunbridge Wells since at least 1800 and the Mann family divided their time between Tunbridge Wells and Hastings, Sussex since the 1840’s. The Cavie family of Frant, who married into the Pace family had been residents of Frant since at least the 1750’s.

My account of the Pace family begins with Joseph Pace (abt 1806-1854) who was a carpenter living in the 1840’s on London Road in the Culverden area. He married Ann Cavie in 1817 in Speldhurst, who was born about 1798, one of two known children born to John Cavie (1753-1838) and Mary Cavie, nee Start.

Joseph and Ann had a son John Alliss Pace (1818-1901) who married Sarah Goodwin (1823-1899) in 1839 and with her had a daughter Mary Pace (1839-1924) who was born  in Tunbridge Wells),and who married photographer Thomas George Mann (1838-1874) who for a time in the had a photographic studio in Tunbridge Wells and later in Hastings.

John Alliss Pace began his career following his father’s footsteps as a carpenter but in the 1860’s he operated a photographic studio on the High Street in Tunbridge Wells. His career as a photographer was a short one for by 1871 he had returned to working as a carpenter and builder in the town. John Alliss Pace had been born in Tunbridge Wells, but died in Brighton,Sussex at age 83. His son John Pace, born 1855 in Hastings lived most of his life in Tunbridge Wells and by the 1980’s was working in the town as a photographer. He married Sarah Paine in Tunbridge Wells in 1879 and with her had three children.

This article reports on the Pace, Cavie and Mann families of Frant, Tunbridge Wells and Hastings, Sussex with an emphasis on their connection to Tunbridge Wells and their photographic work. 

THE CAVIE FAMILY

An indepth study of the Cavie family was not undertaken and what information is presented is in connection with the marriage of Ann Cavie to Joseph Pace.

For my purposes the patriarch of the Cavie family is John Cavie (1753-1838), who like many other members of the Cavie family in Frant were from an agricultural background. The 1841 census for example records William Cavie born about 1782-1786  who at the time of this census was a farmer in Frant living there with his wife Jane and nine children. Other members of the Cavie clan can be found in both Frant and Tunbridge Wells.

John Cavie was born in Frant 1753 and died in Tunbridge Wells February 2,1838. He was buried in the grounds of St Albans Church in Frant and other members of the Cavie clan were buried there also. Shown above  is a photograph of St Albans Church.

John Cavie married Mary Start (born 1772)  were married December 1,1793 in Speldhurst. He and his wife had two known children  (1) Elizabeth Cavie, who was baptised at King Charles the Martyr Church (postcard view opposite) in Tunbridge Wells March 20,1795. She married William Alliss about 1820 and with him had six children born between 1826 and 1836. It is from this marriage that the name “Alliss” became incorporated into the Pace family names. (2) ANN CAVIE. Ann was baptised at King Charles the Martyr Church on May 11, 1798. She married Joseph Pace (1806-1854) on October 9,1817 in Tunbridge Wells and with him had issue. I continue the account of Ann Pace, nee Cavie in the next section.

THE PACE FAMILY

I have to date mentioned the marriage of Ann Cavie to Joseph Pace in Tunbridge Wells on October 9,1817.

Joseph Pace had been born in Kent, about 1806. Details about his parents and siblings were not established . No members of the Pace family were found in the 1824 Pigots directory for Tunbridge Wells, nor in the 1840 Pigots directory or the 1858 Melville directory.

The earliest record for Joseph Pace was the 1847 Poll for Knights which gave Joseph at Culverden Cottages on London Road. The earliest record of the Pace family in Tunbridge Wells was for John Alliss Pace, the son of Joseph Pace, in the 1841 census, details of which I give later. Given  above is a map showing London Road in the Culverden area in 1849.

Joseph Pace and his wife Ann appear to have had only one child, namely John Alllis Pace (1818-1901). John had been born in Speldhurst and was baptised there on March 29,1818. The 1841 census gave John Alliss Pace as a carpenter, living on London Road in the Culverden area. He is found,based on the order in which the census was taken, between “Back Cottages” and “Little Culverden Lodge” where the Robert Barton and his wife and children, including a son Henry Barton were living . The name Barton is well known in connection with the making of Tunbridge Ware in the town. Living with John Allis Pace was his wife Sarah and their daughter Mary.

John Allis Pace had married Sarah Goodwin (1823-1899) in the 4th qtr of 1839 in Tunbridge Wells. Sarah Goodwin had been born 1823 in Withyham,Sussex (postcard view opposite) and died in Brighton,Sussex in the 2nd qtr of 1899.

John Allis Pace and his wife had the following children (1) Mary Pace, born 1839 in Tunbridge Wells. In 1858 she married THOMAS GEORGE MANN, one of the central figures in this article. I continue her story and that of the Mann family in the next section. (2) JOHN PACE, born 1855 in Hastings,Sussex, details of whom are given later.

The 1847 Poll of Knights listed John Alliss Pace in Speldhurst. It is likely he was still living at the same place he was with his family at the time of the 1841 census, and still working as a carpenter.

The 1851 census, taken at No. 7 Edgers Cottage in Tunbridge Wells gave John Allis Pace as a carpenter. With him was his wife Sarah, given as born in Tunbridge Wells in 1823. Also there was their daughter Mary, a scholar and one servant.

The 1861 census, taken at Hertford Lodge, Westford Place, High Street, Tunbridge Wells gave John Alliss Pace as a photographer, operating a portrait studio at that location. With him was his wife Sarah, given as born 1823 at Withyham,Sussex, a place of birth that is repeated is subsequent census records. Also there was their son John Pace and one servant.

Hertford Lodge is referred to in a number of directories. An 1855 Homeopathic Directory listed George H. Hanson MD at Hertford Lodge, High Street. The 1859 Poll for Two Knights listed Henry Sanders at Hertford Lodge, High Street. The 1860 Colbrans guide showed a business advertisement for W. Bond, Architect and Surveyor at Hertford Lodge, High Street. A recent estate agents listing for flats at Herford Place 36-40 High Street, shows on a map that this building, named after Hertford Lodge ,and  that Hertford Lodge was located on the west side of High Street about half way down. Today Hertford Place has at least 6 flats in it on the upper floors and shops below as shown on the modern photo above.  

Their son John Pace (1855-1939) had been born in Hastings,Sussex.He was baptised October 5,1855 in Hastings at St Clements Church.

The photographic career of John Alliss Pace was a short one for by 1871 he had returned to working as a carpenter. No examples of his photographs were found on the internet. The 1862 Kelly directory gave the listing “ John Alliss Pace, photographer, High Street”. The same directory gave the listing “ Sarah Pace, staymaker, High Street. Sarah was his wife and was given as a staymaker in the 1881 census.

The 1871 census, taken at 3 St John’s Road, Tunbridge Wells gave John Alliss Pace as a carpenter. With him was his wife Sarah; his son John and a  granddaughter Kate Mann, born 1867 in Hastings. Kate Mann was the daughter of Thomas George Mann and his wife Mary Mann, nee Pace. This address would indicate that his place of residence was located at the south end of St John’s Road not far north of the junction of it with London Road/Mount Ephraim.

The 1881 census, taken at 3 St John’s Road, Tunbridge Wells gave John Allis Pace as a builder. With him was his wife Sarah, a staymaker;  his son John ( now working as a photographer in the town) and daughter in law Sarah Pace, born 1860 in Camberwell,Surrey. Also there was a grandson John Alliss Pace, age 10 mths, born in Tunbridge Wells.

John Pace (1855-1939) had married Sarah in 1880 and in 1881 had his first child John Allis Pace, born in Tunbridge Wells. John Pace later moved to Brighton, Sussex where he died in the 1st qtr of 1939.

The 1891 census, taken at the Feathers Hotel at 53 Queens Road in Brighton,Sussex gave John Allis Pace as a hotel proprietor. With him was his wife Sarah, age 68 and a granddaughter Annie Mann, age 21, born 1870 in Hastings,Sussex who was working as a general domestic servant. Also living with the family was one other domestic servant. The Feathers Hotel was still operating under that name in 1947. Some information about it can be found on the internet and shown opposite is a photograph of it at 53 Queens Road. He had also been the landlord of The Carpenters Arm in Priory Road, Hastings , and the landlord of The King’s Head Commercial and Family Inn in Court House Street, Hastings.

The 1901 census, taken at 32 New Road in Brighton, Sussex gave John Alliss Pace as a widow (his wife Sarah had died in Brighton  in the 2nd qtr of 1899) and was living on own means. With him was just his daughter Marty Dyer, age 60 (born 1841) given as married. She was in fact his daughter Mary born 1839 in Tunbridge Wells who married Thomas George Mann (1838-1874) but remarried after his death. Detials about this are given later in the section on the Mann family.

Probate records for John Allis Pace gave him of 15 Surrey Street in Brighton when he died on July 22,1901. The executors of his 107 pound estate was his son John Pace, licensed victuallers manager, and his daughter Mary Dyer, the wife of Clifford Dyer.

Having completed my coverage of John Allis Pace I now continue with is son John Pace (1855-1939). The last record given for him apart from the probate record of his father in 1901 was the 1881 census taken at 2 St Johns Road in Tunbridge Wells where he was a photographer and living with his parents and his wife Sarah and son John Allis Pace, born in Tunbridge Wells in 1881.

John Pace had married Sarah Paine in Tunbridge Wells in the 4th qtr of 1879. Sarah had been born in Camberwell, Surrey about 1861. John had been born in Hastings 1855 and was baptised there October 5,1855.

The 1891 census, taken at 47 Queens Road, Brighton gave John Pace with the unusual occupation of Bird dog fancier. With him was his wife Sarah and their children (1) John Allis Pace, born 1881 Tunbridge Wells (2) Harold Stanley Pace, born 1867 in Croydon,Surrey. Also present was one visitor. A postcard view of Queens Road, Brighton is shown opposite.

The 1901 census, taken at 3 North Quadrant, Brighton, Sussex, gave John Pace as an ironmongers clerk. With him was his wife Sarah and his children John Allice Pace, a solicitors clerk; Harold F, age 14 ; and their daughter Dorothy Ethel Pace, born 1897 in Brighton.

The 1911 census, taken at 10 North Gardens, Brighton, Sussex gave John Pace as a restaurant waiter worker. With him was his wife Sarah and their daughter Dorothy Ethel who was in school. The census records they were living in premises of 5 rooms; that they had been married 31 years (1880) and had four children but only three were still living. It is expected the fourth child that does not show up in census records died as an infant soon after birth.

John Pace died in Brighton Sussex in the 1st qtr of 1939 and his wife died the same year in the 3rd qtr.

THE MANN FAMILY

The connection between the Pace and Mann families is by way of the marriage between Mary Pace (1839-1924), the daughter of John Allis Pace and Thomas George Mann (1838-1874) on November 1,1858. Mary had been living with her parents before the marriage and I have given details in this regard earlier.

Mary and Thomas George Mann had the following children (1) Edith Alice, born 1859 in Tunbridge Wells (2) Herbert, born 1862 in Tunbridge Wells who died in 1927 (3) Frederick (John) Mann born 1863 in Hastings and died in 1946 (4) Kate, born 1866 in Hastings (5) Annie born 1870 in Hastings and died in 1946). Previously I noted that Kate Mann was living with her grandparents John Alliss Pace and Sarah Pace at the time of the 1871 census, taken at 3 St Johns Road, Tunbridge Wells. Also Annie Mann was living with her grandparents at the time of the 1891 census taken at the Feathers Hotel in Brighton.

When Mary's husband Thomas George Mann died in 1874 she married Thomas Tidy, born 1846, the son of Thomas Tidy (1815-1875) and Jane Tidy (1816-1882) and had three siblings. Mary and Thomas Tidy had four children born between 1877 and 1883 namely (1) May (1877-1963) (2) Rose, born 1881 in Southborough (3) Thomas Mann Tidy born and died in Tunbridge Wells after birth in 1881 (4) Thomas Pace Tidy who was born and died in Tunbridge Wells in 1883. At the time of the 1881 census, Mary and her husband and children were living in Tunbridge Wells on Holden Road where Thomas Tidy was working as a  blacksmith. At the time of the 1891 census Mary and Thomas were living at the Eastern Hotel in Brighton where Mary was the pub hotel keeper. Her husband Thomas must have died later in the 1890s and remarried for she is found in the 1901 census living as Mary Dyer, age 60 with her father John Allis Pace at 32 New Road in Brighton, Sussex. Mary was also given as one of the executors of her fathers estate in 1901 and given at that time as Mary Dyer wife of Clifford Dyer. Mary died in Brighton on January 13,1924.

Thomas George Mann opened his photographic studio at  20 Robertson Street in Hastings, the premises of his father, in the summer of 1856. The following year Thomas G. Mann entered into a partnership with a Mr Pedder, forming the firm of Pedder & Mann. Mr Pedder was the senior man and had extensive photographic experience. This partnership however was brief for Melville’s directory of 1858 gave Thomas G. Mann operating on his own at his 20 Robertson Street studio. In the latter part of 1858 Thomas George Mann left Hastings for Tunbridge Wells and it was during that time that he met the Pace family, which resulted in his marriage to Mary Pace. Since both Thomas G. Mann and John Alliss Pace were both photographers at that time it is no wonder that the two families came to known one another and it is possible that while in Tunbridge Wells Thomas G. Mann worked with or for John Alliss Pace at his studio in Tunbridge Wells. Unfortunatley there are no photographs to be found on the internet of the work of John Alliss Pace or Thomas G. Mann in Tunbridge Wells. Shown above  is one of several photographs  by Thomas George Mann taken at his studio at 20 Robertson Street, Hastings.

Thomas George Mann referred to above was born in Hastings June 16,1838 at 2 Wellington Cottages.and was one of four children born to Thomas Mann (1816-1903) and Elizabeth Mann, nee Ashdown (1814-1842).  Elizabeth died August 12,1842 at St Clements, Hastings. In 1851 Thomas G. Mann was living with his stepmother and father and siblings in Hastings.

Thomas Mann (1816-1903) was a carver and gilder by trade. He was born 1816 at Ringmer, Sussex and died March 24,1903 in Hastings. He was the son of James Mann and Hannah Mann (1786-1882). Thomas married Elizabeth Ashdown (1814-1842) in St Mary’s Chapel in St Mary on the Castle, Hastings, Sussex and at that time he was living at 2 Wellington Cottages. Sometime after the death of his wife Elizabeth he married Harriet West (born 1819) and with her had a son Frederick James Mann (1849-1915) who was born in Hastings February 2,1849. At the time of the 1861 census Thomas Mann was at 20 Robertson Road in Hastings which was the photographic studio of his son Thomas G. Mann and both men operated their business from the same premises. Shown opposite are two images of prints published by Thomas Mann (1816-1903). Other examples of his photographs and other works can be found on the internet and further details about his career in Hastings can be found on the Hastings photographers website.

Probate records for Thomas Mann gave him at  2 Gainsborough Villas,De Cham Rd, St Leonards on Sea, when he died March 24,1903 leaving an estate valued at 29,537 pounds to his son Frederick James Mann (solicitor); his widow Harriet Mann; his children Elizabeth Hannah Mann (spinster), and Alfred Knight, gentleman. The Elizabeth Hannah Mann (1836-1926) referred to was the daughter of Thomas Mann and an unknown wife (his first wife), making Elizabeth Ashdown his second wife.

The 1861 census, taken at 2 Russell Street in Hastings gave Thomas G. Mann as a photographer, operating a photo studio in that town. With him was his wife Mary and daughter Edith Alice , who was born in Tunbridge Wells in 1859. Also in the home was one lodger and one domestic servant. As noted earlier the couple returned to Tunbridge Wells later for in 1862 their son Herbert was born in the town. Soon after his birth the Mann family returned to Hastings.

The 1871 census, taken at Granville Villa, Vale Road, Hastings gave Thomas G. Mann as a photographer, now operating a photo studio in Hastings. With him was his wife Mary and his four children Edith, Herbert, Frederick and Annie. Thomas George Mann died in Hastings in the 2nd qtr of 1874.

The Mann family had a long history in Hastings. There was a Frederick Stephen Mann (1822-1904) who had been born in Frant, Sussex who like Thomas Mann (1816-1903) became a carver and gilder and it is believed by the researcher that they were brothers. In 1841 Frederick left Frant and moved to outskirts of Hastings. In 1843 he married Elizabeth Sarah Mann, born 1822 in Southbourne,Kent. Frederick opened a grocery shop about 1850 in Hastings at 33 All Saints Street but in addition to selling groceries he made picture frames, both of which are noted as his occupation in the 1855 Kelly directory. By 1857 he had taken up premises at 8 York Place, Hastings By 1858 he was a carver and gilder at 13 Wellington Place. A directory of 1858 gave him as a carver and gilder and looking glass and picture frame manufacturer and also was operating an artist’s supply shop. At the time of the 1861 census Frederick and his wife had no children and were still living at 13 Wellington Place. F.S. Mann’s stationary and fancy repository gradually evolved into a photographic depot at 13 Wellington Street and he advertised the availability of “first class photographic and stereographic views of Hastings, St Leonards and the surrounding area. Frederick produced many lovely photographs, both studio CDV's and views of local scenes and had a long and successful career. Further details about him and several examples of his work can be found on the Hastings photographers website. Shown opposite is one example of his work.

Shown below left  is a 1905 view of Wellington Place in Hastings. At the time this photo was taken No. 13 Wellington Place, the former premises of Frederick Stephen Mann, was the premises of Herbert Mann, who was born in Tunbridge Wells in 1861(baptised Dec. 29,1861), being the son of Thomas G. Mann. Herbert was operating a carver and gilders business from this location.














 
I close off my coverage of this topic by showing a studio card of Robert Bell Hutchinson, who was born in Tunbridge Wells July 8,1858. He had married Clara Sparke who was born 1849 in Westminster. They settled in Hastings in 1869 where he worked as a photographer. By 1874 he had moved his photographic business to 55 Robertson Street, Hastings, the same year that Thomas George Mann died and took over Manns studio and some 19,000 negatives of his. For further details about Mr Hutchinson see my article ‘ The Photographic Career of Robert Bell Hutchinson’ dated June 14,2014.

 

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