ALL ABOUT
TUNBRIDGE WELLS

Page 2

 

THE ALEXANDRA TEMPERACE HOTEL

 

Written By: Edward James Gilbert-Thunder Bay, Ontario, Canada

Date: November 28,2018

OVERVIEW 

The Alexandra Temperance Hotel was located at 37-39 Vale Road, on the east side of the road opposite the Post Office (built 1896).

The hotel began as a 3 sty large lodging house and dates back to the mid 19th century. In 1882 it was a lodging house operated by Mrs Maria Poer but by  1899 it was the Alexandra Temperance Hotel operated by William Youde. By 1911 the Alexandra Termperance Hotel was operated by a widow, Mrs Helen H. Bagg, nee Holden (1850-1917) and her son Henry George Lionel Bagg(1881-1935), both of whom died in Tunbridge Wells while residents of 76 Yewtree Road in Southborough.

In the period of 1918 to 1923 the Alexandra Temperance Hotel was run by Mrs Grace Agnes Thomas, nee Gibb (1874-1925) who died in Tunbridge Wells at Boundary House. She was survived by her husband James Lansdell Thomas  and her two children.

As no record of the hotel from 1930 onwards was located it appears that it was demolished. On the site today is Regency House.

Shown above is a business advertisement card dated 1923 for the hotel. No photographs of the building were located but later a postcard view of Vale Road provides a partial view of the hotel.  Information about the proprietors of the hotel are given in the following sections of this article.

LOCATION AND DESCRIPTION 

Shown opposite is a postcard view looking towards Vale Road from London Road by local photographer and postcard printer/publisher Harold Camburn.  The large building on the north west corner is the Post Office (built in 1896) . Across from the Post Office can be seen a shop/garage and next to it further up Vale Road is a large 3 sty building that became the Alexandra Temperance Hotel. Both the old hotel and the shop(s) on the corner were demolished and on the site today is Regency House.

The building was quite large, described in the 1911 census as having 17 rooms. The building itself can be seen on maps of the 19th century and although the earliest located resident of the building at 37-39 Vale Road was Mrs Maria Poer in 1882, the building dates back many years before that date and was in use during that time as a lodging house. Its conversion into a hotel took place around the beginning of the 20th century.

Temperance hotels became popular during the Temperance Movement. The Temperance movement in the United Kingdom originated as a mass movement in the 19th century. Before this, though there were diatribes published against drunkenness and excess, total abstinence from alcohol was very rarely advocated or practised. Joseph William Livesey (5 March 1794 – 2 September 1884) was an English temperance campaigner, social reformer, local politician, writer, publisher, newspaper proprietor and philanthropist, who in 1833 opened the first Temperance Hotel in Britain, and the next year founded the first temperance magazine, The Preston Temperance Advocate (1834–37). The British Association for the Promotion of Temperance was established by 1835.

THE OCCUPANTS

Given below is a list of the known proprietors of the building based on a review of local directories and newspapers and various genealogical records. The list is by no means complete and all dates are approximate unless otherwise stated.

1882………….Mrs Maria Poer

1899…………. William Youde

1911…………. Mrs Helen Bagg

1918-1923… Mrs Grace Agnes Thomas

[1] MRS MARIA POER

No definitive information about her was located except she was listed as in a 1874 directory as a lodging house keeper at 23 Vale Road and in 1882 as a lodging house keeper of 39 Vale Road.

[2] WILLIAM YOUDE

No definitive information for this gentleman was found apart from a 1899 directory listing giving “ Alexandra Temperance Hotel (William Youde) 37 & 39 Vale Road.”

William was not found listed in Tunbridge Wells at the time of the 1901 or 1911 census and no other directory listings for him in the town were found.

[3] MRS HELEN BAGG 

Helen was found in the 1911 census under the listing “ Alexandra Hotel 37-39 Vale Road. Helen was listed as  a widow and born 1850 in Hackney, Middlesex with the occupation of hotel keeper. With her was her son Henry George Lionel Bagg(1881-1935) who was born January 14,1881 at Stepney, Middlesex. At the time of this census Henry was working as an assistant to his mother at the hotel. Henry went on to marry Nellie Brown (1901-1993) June 5,1922 in Tunbridge Wells. He died on Southborough July 15,1935. Also present at the time of this census were four boarders and three servants.

Helen H. Bagg, nee Holden (1850-1937) was born in the 1st qtr of 1850 at Hackney, London. She was given in records as the daughter of Henry Holden (1819-1885) and Emma Holden (born 1816). At the time of the 1851 census Helen was living with her parents at Tottenham, Middlesex. Throughout the 1860’s and 1870’s she lived with her parents in Islington St Mary, Middlesex.  At the time of the 1871 census Helen was living with her married sister Elizabeth Weare and her family at Wincanton,Somerset.

In the 2nd qtr of 1877, at Bethnal Green Helen married James Bagg(1844-1908) and with him had the following children (1) Charles Holden Bagg (1878-1952) (2) Henry George Lionel Bagg (1881-1935).

James Bagg  had been born March 16,1844 at 10 Squirries Street, Bethnal Green, one of eight children born to Benjamin Joseph Bagg (1808-1888) and Sarah Bagg, nee Callieu (1810-1881). Up to the time of his marriage to Helen he lived with his parents and siblings in Bethnal Green. On May 22,1864 he married Mary Norris at Behtnal Green but by 1877 she had passed away without bearing children. His second and last marriage was to Helen in 1877,

The 1881 census,taken at 55 Tredegar Square in London gave James Bagg as a wholesale clothier. With him was his wife Helen and their two sons as well as one domestic servant.

Moving ahead to the 1901 census James Bagg and his wife Helen and his widowed mother Sarah were living at 57 Maury Road in London. James was a commercial traveller at that time. James died in London in the first qtr of 1908. Soon after her husband’s death Helen moved to Tunbridge Wells and took over the Alexandra Temperance Hotel.

Helen’s son,who assisted her in the running of the hotel died July 16,1935 at the Kent & Sussex Hospital. His home address was given in probate records as 78 Yewtree Road, Southborough. The executors of his 2,928 pound estate were Nellie Bagg, widow; Alfred Edward Brown, bricklayer; and John William Kirby, local government officer.

Probate records for Helen Bagg gave her of 76 Yewtree Road, Southborough when she died November 19,1937 at Restholme, Tunbridge Wells. The executor of her 181 pound estate was Nelly Bagg, a widow. 

[4] MRS GRACE AGNES THOMAS

Mrs Grace Agnes Thomas was listed in directories from 1918 to 1923 as the proprietor of the Alexandra Temperance Hotel. No directory listings for the hotel were found from 1930 onwards.

Grace had been born as Grace Agnes Gibb in the first qtr of 1874 in Wadhurst, Sussex. She was the daughter of David William Gibb (1834-1929) and Catherine Jane Gibb, nee Potter (1838-1922). Grace was one of ten children in the family.

In the years leading up to 1891 Grace lived with her parents and siblings in Wadhurst. The 1881 census taken at Best Beech Hill in Wadhurst gave her father David as a wheelwright. With him was his wife Catherine and seven of their children including Grace who was attending school.

The 1891 census taken at Hageshurst, Frant gave Grave working as a domestic servant for retired commander of the Royal Navy Walter H, Lewis who at the time of the census was a schoolmaster of a boys school with 24 pupils. Walters wife and two children were with him and in addition to Grace there were seven other servants at the school.

In the 1st qtr of 1901, Grace married James Lansdell Thomas (1861-1912), which marriage was registered at Ticehurst. James had been born in Bexhill, Sussex, one of several children born to Edward Thomas (1824-1876) and Ann Thomas (1830-1921). Up until the death of his father Edward in 1876 at Battle, Sussex he had lived with his parents and siblings in Bexhill. After 1876 he lived with his widowed mother in Bexhill.

The 1901 census taken at 12 Station Road in Bexhill James was working as an auctioneer and rate collector at home. With him was his wife Grace and his widowed mother Ann. One domestic servant was also there.

The 1911 census, taken at the Victoria Temperance Hotel at Market Harborg, Leicestershire, gave James as an auctioneer’s clerk unemployed. With him was his wife Grace who was given as the proprietor of the temperance hotel and two of their children. The census recorded that the couple had been married ten years and that they had two children. The census recorded that the premises had twelve rooms. Catherine Emma Gibb, age 22 (James niece) was working as an assistant at the hotel. At the time the hotel had just one boarder.

James Lansdell Thomas died in Tunbridge Wells in 1933 and was buried in the Tunbridge Wells Borough Cemetery October 9th.

Probate records for Grace gave her of Boundary House, Tunbridge Wells (wife of James Lansdell Thomas) when she died March 16,1925 at Malling Place in Malling, Kent. The executors of her 2,405 pound estate was her solicitor and Frank Gibb, a store keeper. No burial record was found for her.

THE BROADWOOD FAMILY OF TUNBRIDGE WELLS

Written By: Edward James Gilbert-Thunder Bay, Ontario, Canada

Date: November 23,2018

PREAMBLE 

The impetuous for this article was a CDV by Tunbridge Wells photographer Edward Sims (1831-1914) showing the gravesite of Mary Wilhelmina Broadwood (1852-1866) at St Paul’s Church, Rusthall behind the wall of the Apse. This image is unusual for two reasons. Firstly, Edward Sims was primarily a studio photographer and any images taken by him outside of his studio are very rare. Secondly the subject matter of a grave on a cdv is very uncommon, although similar images by other photographers can be found on occasion.  Details about the life and career of Edward Sims can be found in my article ‘The Photographic Careers of Edward and Thomas Sims’ dated March 1, 2012.

The discovery of this interesting image (shown above) led me to research Mary Wilhelmina Broadwood, a young lady who died far too young and a young lady, from the grandness of her grave, that most likely came from a wealthy and perhaps important family. In the ‘Overview’ below I summarize the results of this research and in the sections that follow I expand on what turned out to be a fascinating story of the Broadwood family in general, but more specifically as it relates to the time they lived in fine homes in Tunbridge Wells.

While residents of the town the Broadwoods took an active role in local political and social affairs; gave generously to various important causes such as the General Hospital and sports, and lived out the remainder of their lives in Tunbridge Wells.

Many articles making reference to them were found in the Kent & Sussex Courier. Like their beloved daughter Mary ,Henry Shudi Broadwood (1793-1878) and Frances Lonsdale Broadwood, nee Lowther, (1818-1890) were also buried at St Paul’s Church, Rusthall. They were survived by two sons Arthur Broadwood  CV CBO (1849-1928) and Alfred Stephen Broadwood (1856-1911) who were born in Tunbridge Wells and went on to have distinguished military careers.

OVERVIEW

The central figures in this article are Henry Shudi Broadwood (1793-1878); his wife Frances Lonsdale Broadwood , nee Lowther(1818-1890); and their three children Mary Wilhelmina Broadwood (1853-1866), Arthur Broadwood CB CVO (1849-1928) and Alfred Stephen Broadwood (1856-1911).

Henry Shudi Broadwood was one of several children born to noted piano maker John Broadwood (1732-1812) who’s business, under the style of John Broadwood & Sons ,was founded in 1728 by Burkat Shudi and carried on by John and his descendants. Henry however came into a large inheritance at age 21 with the stipulation that he go into the brewery business and so he and his partner James Goding (1791-1856) formed a partnership and established the Lion Brewery on Golden Street, Westminster, London. This partnership ran its course for 21 years until 1835 when the partners went their separate ways and Henry continued the brewery for many years with other partners, Further details about this aspect of Henry’s life are given later. Henry was also involved in other business interests, some of which did not prove profitable and his extravagant lifestyle and obsession with fine art, ballet, opera and gambling resulted in significant ups and downs in his financial position and the premature selling of his homes to settle debts.

Henry took an active interest in politics and served as a Member of Parliament for Bridgewater from 1837 to 1852. A number of articles about his political activities while living in Tunbridge Wells were found in the Kent & Sussex Courier.

On May 19,1840, in London,  Henry married the wealthy spinster Frances Lonsdale Lowther (1818-1890), the illegitimate daughter of William Lowther, the 2nd Earl of Lonsdale (1787-1872) and Pierre-Narchisse Chaspoux, a dancer at the Paris opera, who died in Paris 1838. Frances had been given a dowry of 10,000 pounds with the stipulation that her husband was not to benefit from the funds. She also inherited a large Trust Fund in her name, funds she gave generously from to support causes of interest to her while living in Tunbridge Wells.

Henry and Frances had three children namely (1) Mary Wilhelmina Broadwood who had been born in Tunbridge Wells November 27,1852. She had a short life having succumbed ,at age 14, to disease that swept through Kent and elsewhere. She was buried at St Paul’s Church Rusthall behind the wall in a large fenced enclosure at one end of which was a large marble statue bearing the image of a weeping angel and the word ‘Faith’.  (2) Arthur Broadwood CB CVO (1849-1928) was born in Tunbridge Wells March 21,1849. In 1873 he married Mary Frances Meade at St George Hanover Square and with her had six children. He had a distinguished military career but grew up in Tunbridge Wells and is mentioned in various articles in the Kent & Sussex Courier in the 1870’s-1890’ period. He died January 2,1928 in Hove Sussex. (3) Alfred Stephen Broadwood (1856-1911) was born in Tunbridge Wells. Like his brother Arthur, he dedicated his life to a military career. He was first married in 1880 to Julia Dalrmple Hathorn (1854-1904) and with her had three children but the marriage ended in divorce. His second marriage was to Lilian Susette Watson (1873-1931) in Marylebone 1902 but apparently there were no children from this marriage. Alfred died May 31,1911 in Winslow, Buckinghamshire.

JOHN BROADWOOD AND FAMILY 

Henry Shudi Broadwood was one of several children born to noted piano maker John Broadwood (1732-1812) who’s business, under the style of John Broadwood & Sons ,was founded in 1728 by Burkat Shudi and carried on by John and his descendants. An image of John Broadwood is shown opposite and below is a sample image of one of their piano’s made in 1827,  and advertisements of them .

John Broadwood had been born October 6,1732 in Oldhamstocks, London one of five children born to James Broadwood (1697-1774) and Margaret Broadwood, nee Purvis (1697-1799). He was christened October 15,1732 at St Helens, Cockbirnspath, Berkshire.

On January 12,1769, at Saint James, Westminster, London John married Barbara Tschudi (1748-1776) and with her had six children between 1769 and 1776.  

On December 20,1781 John married his second wife Mary Ann Kitson, at St James Westminster, the daughter of James Kitson. She had been born February 17,1752 and died in Kensington June 15,1839. John and Mary had the following children (1) William (1783-1789) (2) Charles Bell (1784-1803) (3) Thomas (1786-1861) (4) Mary (1789-1803) (5) Barbara (1790-1793) (6) HENRY SHUDI BROADWOOD (1793-1878) one of the central figures in this article. All of the children of John and Mary were born in various parts of London.

John was a Scottish joiner and cabinetmaker and came to London in 1761 and began to work for the Swiss harpsichord manufacturer Burkat Shudi. John Married Shudi’s daughter eight years later and became a partner in the firm in 1770. As the popularity of the harpsichord declined, the firm concentrated increasingly on the manufacture of pianos, abandoning the harpsichord altogether in 1793. John’s son James Shudi Broadwood (1772-1851) had worked for the firm since 1785 and in 1795 the firm began to trade as John Broadwood & Son. When  John’s third son Thomas Broadwood (born 1775) became a partner in 1808 the firm traded as John Broadwood & Sons Ltd, which name it retains today. Further details about the business can be found on such websites as Wikipedia and the Dictionary of Nation Biography which can be read online provides further details about John and his career.  John Broadwood died July 17,1812 and the business passed along under the ownership of his descendants. A tablet that was raised by his son Thomas in memory of his parents is shown opposite. The Kent and Sussex Courier published many advertisments regarding the sale of Broadwood pianos by various vendors in Tunbridge Wells.

HENRY SHUDI BROADWOOD AND FAMILY –THE EARLY YEARS  

Henry Shudi Broadwood was one of several children born to noted piano maker John Broadwood (1732-1812) and his second wife Mary Ann Broadwood, nee Kitson (1752-1839). Henry was the youngest child from this marriage and was born August 8,1793 at Kensington. He was baptised September 8,1793 at Wells Street Scotch Church, Marylebone.

Unlike his brothers, Henry did not join the family piano business. Henry came into a large (20,000 pound) inheritance at age 21 with the stipulation that he go into the brewery business and so he and his partner James Goding (1791-1856) formed a partnership and established the Lion Brewery on Golden Street, Westminster, London.  James Goding had come from a wealthy brewing family and had a head for business, something that Henry lacked. This partnership ran its course for 21 years until 1835 when Henry bought the business outright for 165,000 pounds the partners went their separate ways. Henry continued the brewery for many years with other partners. Shown opposite is an image of the Lion Brewery on Golden Street. The National Archives holds records pertaining to Henry Broadwood and the Lion Brewery.

Henry was also involved in other business interests, some of which did not prove profitable. He was one of the directors of James Caleb Anderson’s ambitious but unproductive steam carriage and wagon company in the late 1830’s. His name is also listed among the directors of the Sovereign Life Assurance Company in the late 1840’s.

The love of music  understandably ran through the Broadwood family and contributed to Henry’s live long love of opera and the ballet. He was one of the founders of the Garrick Club in 1831 and contributed to several charitable projects in the 1830’s and 1840’s. He was a collector of French art in particular, and paintings in general.

Henry’s extravagant lifestyle and obsession with fine art, ballet, opera and gambling resulted in significant ups and downs in his financial position and the premature selling of his homes to settle debts.

Henry took an active interest in politics. He was a Conservative politician who served as a Member of Parliament for Bridgewater from May 16,1837 to July 7,1852.  After unsuccessfully contesting the 1835 general election for Bridgwater, Henry became the Conservative MP for the same seat at a by-election in 1837-caused by the resignation of John Temple Leader. The election, which was notoriously corrupt is said to have cost Henry a fortune. In the same year he took out a lease of 15 Carlton House Terrace, one of the new houses designed by Nash and Decimus Burton at the heart of London’s political and social life.

Carlton House Terrace (image opposite dated 1831) is a street in the St James's district of the City of Westminster in London. Its principal architectural feature is a pair of terraces of white stucco-faced houses on the south side of the street overlooking St. James's Park. These terraces were built on Crown land between 1827 and 1832 to overall designs by John Nash, but with detailed input by other architects including Decimus Burton. These elegant townhouses took the place of Carlton House, and the freehold still belongs to the Crown Estate.

In 1837 Henry held a concert at his house. His extravagance explains why after only a few months of occupancy he sold the house and contents to Lord Lowther, the future 2nd Earl of Lonsdale ‘Lord Lowther’. Among the contents was a fine collection of paintings. Both Henry and Lowther frequently went to France and became good friends, and this is how Henry met to know his future wife Frances Lonsdale Lowther. Both Henry and Lowther had a passion for opera and the ballet and spent much of their time in Paris. Henry also frequented the gambling tables where he lost large sums of money and no doubt he thought his marriage to Frances would turn his financial position around.

On May 19,1840 Henry married Frances Lonsdale Lowther (1818-1890), the illegitimate daughter of William Lowther, the 2nd Earl of Lonsdale (1787-1872) and Pierre-Narchisse Chaspoux, a dancer at the Paris opera, who died in Paris 1838.  The marriage took place at Saint Martin in the Fields, Westminster, London.  After the death of her mother Frances lived with her father in London at the Lowther town house 15 Carlton House Terrace where she remained until her marriage to Henry.  Frances had been born June 8,1818 at St James, Middlesex and was baptised July 29,1818 at Saint James, Westminster.

William Lowther 2nd Earl of Lonsdale had been born July 30,1787 and died at Carlton Terrace March 4,1872. He had been baptised August 30,1787 at Uffington, Lincoln and given as the son of William (the 1st Earl) and Augusta. Shown opposite is a photo of William and Augusta.  Shown below is a photo of William Lowter the 2nd Earl. Further details about the 2nd Earl can be found in the records of the Cambridge University Alumni and the Dictionary of National Biography and on other websites.

Lowther Castle (image opposite) is a country home in Westmorland, not part of the modern county of Cambria. This grand residence had belonged to the Lowther family since the Middle Ages. The building was extensively renovated if not rebuilt over the years. John Lowther had followed his father’s footsteps and became a politician and became an MP for 33 years until 1841. When his father died in 1844 her inherited the Lowther estates. Although William did not marry he had several illegitimate children, two of whom inherited large sums on his death. When William died in 1872 with no legitimate heirs the Lowther Estates passed to his nephew Henry Lowther who became the 3rd earl.

Frances had been given a dowry of 10,000 pounds with the stipulation that her husband was not to benefit from the funds. She also inherited a large Trust Fund from her father’s will, funds she gave generously from to support causes of interest to her while living in Tunbridge Wells. The will stipulated in part that the Trust Fund was “for her sole and separate use independently and exclusively of her husband or any other husband that she might take later”.

Directories of 1843 to 1847 listed Henry at 5 Whitehall Yard, London. By 1849 Henry and Frances moved to Tunbridge Wells where they started a family.

THE TUNBRIDGE WELLS ERA

When Henry and his wife moved to Tunbridge Wells Henry was still the MP for Bridgwater, which seat he held until 1852 when he did not seek re-election. A number of articles about his political activities while living in Tunbridge Wells were found in the Kent & Sussex Courier.

Henry and Frances had three children namely (1) Mary Wilhelmina Broadwood who had been born in Tunbridge Wells November 27,1852. She had a short life having succumbed ,at age 14, to disease (Cholera)that swept through Kent and elsewhere in 1866. She was buried at St Paul’s Church Rusthall behind the wall in a large fenced enclosure at one end of which was a large marble statue bearing the image of a weeping angel and the word ‘Faith’.  (2) Arthur Broadwood CB CVO (1849-1928) was born in Tunbridge Wells March 21,1849. In 1873 he married Mary Frances Meade at St George Hanover Square and with her had six children. He had a distinguished military career but grew up in Tunbridge Wells and is mentioned in various articles in the Kent & Sussex Courier in the 1870’s-1890’ period. He died January 2,1928 in Hove Sussex. (3) Alfred Stephen Broadwood (1856-1911) was born in Tunbridge Wells. Like his brother Arthur, he dedicated his life to a military career. He was first married in 1880 to Julia Dalrmple Hathorn (1854-1904) and with her had three children but the marriage ended in divorce. His second marriage was to Lilian Susette Watson (1873-1931) in Marylebone 1902 but apparently there were no children from this marriage. Alfred died May 31,1911 in Winslow, Buckinghamshire. Shown opposite from the National Portrait Gallery is a photograph of the three Broadwood children taken while residents of Tunbridge Wells but taken by Camille Silgvy(1834-1910) on August 23,1862 at his studio at 38 Porchester Terrace in Bayswater, London.

The death of their daughter Mary in 1866 was a terrible blow to the family.The image of Mary’s gravesite, given in the ‘Overview’ was commissioned by her parents. Edward Sims went to gravesite not long after the fine tribute to Mary was erected and produced several copies of the CDV for distribution among the Broadwood family. The handsome statue and base were constructed of marble and most likely made and installed by Burslems, stonemasons and monument makers of Tunbridge Wells. Shown opposite is a closeup view of the head of the statue and also given here is a modern view of it in colour. Probate records for Mary Wilhelmina Broadwood gave her late of Tunbridge Wells who died August 20,1866. The executor of her under 600 pound estate was her father Henry Broadwood.

The 1851 census, taken at 1 Jerningham House (image opposite) , Mount Sion, Tunbridge Wells, gave Henry as a member of parliament and a proprietor. With him was his wife Frances and their son Arthur and five servants. Local directories list Henry at Jerningham House from 1852 to 1857 and in Mount Sion in 1858.

The 1861 census, taken at Bowling Green House, Mount Sion, gave Frances as a fund holder. With her was her daughter Mary and son Alfred. Also there were six servants. The 1861 census taken at Holmburh Upper Beeding,Sussex gave Henry Broadwood as a visitor with the Thomas Broadwood (born 1787) family and eleven servants. Shown opposite is a photograph of Henry and Frances Broadwood. Of the Broadwood family Roger Farthing in his book ‘A History of Mount Sion’ stated regarding Bowling Green House that “ In 1850 Colbran’s Guide Mrs Kemp , a 49 year old widow from London was living there with her daughter and four servants. By January 6,1860 Mr and Mrs Broadwood had moved in and they were to be the last occupants of Bowling Green House and at the time of the 1851 census were living at Jerningham House. In 1871 Bowling Green House was unoccupied according to the 1871 census although Henry Broadwood was listed in Kelley’s directory at Bowling Green House for that year.

The 1871 census, taken at 14 Bolton Street, London gave Henry as a civil servant. With him was his wife Frances and their son Arthur who was a Lieutenant in the Scottish Guards. Also there were five servants.

Probate records gave Henry Broadwood esq. formerly of Calverley Park Gardens but late of Lansdown, Tunbridge Wells, when he died April 2,1878 at Lansdown. The executor of his under 1,500 pound estate was his widow Frances. He was buried at the same site as his daughter in the cemetery at St Paul’s Rusthall Church with his name inscribed on the stonework. Henry’s residence named Lansdown was a fine home located at No. 4 Calverley Park Gardens.

The 1881 census, taken at 4 Calverley Park Gardens inTunbridge Wells gave Frances Broadwood as a widow and annuitant. With her were 8 servants. A modern view of this home is shown opposite.

 

 

Probate records gave Frances Broadwood late of Lansdowne, Tunbridge Wells, when she died October 8,1890 at Lansdown. The executors of her 31,157 pound estate were her son Arthur Broadwood of Chantry House Ecckleston Square, London, a Lieut Colonel in H.M. Scottish Guards. Frances was buried in the churchyard of St Paul’s Rusthall Church (image below) and the name of her and her husband is inscribed on the stone work of the grave.

 The Courier, in reporting on her death stated in part “ It is with great regret that we chronicle the demise of Mrs Broadwood, which occurred at her residence. The deceased lady was the head of the oldest and most respected families in the town and the late Mr Broadwood will long be remembered not only for his generous support of every good movement but as a leader of fashion. The funeral took place on Saturday afternoon last in the family vault at Rusthall Churchyard, the Rev. Dr. Ash of Hungershall Parl, a friend of the family, performing the service. An open car was used, and the coffin which was of massive oak and brass fittings was entirely covered with the most magnificent crosses and wreaths. Among the many who attended the funeral was a delegation from the Conservative working men of the town of whose cause the deceased lady was a great supporter, taking a special interest in the welfare of the East Ward Association. The car bearing Mrs Broadwood was followed by a long line of carriages to the church and the service was attended by family members, friends and representatives from the town and various organizations.”

From a review of local newspaper records up to 1900 at least four dozen articles were found making reference to Henry, his wife Frances, their three children and other members of the Broadwood clan who came to visit Tunbridge Wells.

The Courier of October 13,1876 reported that a grand pianoforte concert was put on at the Great Hall by Broadwood & Sons. Several advertisments appeared in the 1870’s and 1880’s regarding the sale of Broadwood pianos at various music shops in the town.

When Henry Broadwood passed away in 1878 large numbers of his family came to town for the funeral. The Courier of April 12,1878 gave an obituary for Henry and details about the funeral.

Several articles in the Courier including that of February 6,1885 reported on the generosity of financial support by Frances Broadwood to the General Hospital (image opposite).  They Courier of June 30,1885 reported in an entertainment at the General Hospital “kindly given by Mrs Broadwood to the inpatients”.

The Courier of June 12,1877 reported on the Annual Fashionable Ball in Tunbridge Wells put on by Mrs A. Broadwood ( France’s daughter in law).

The Courier of November 12,1875 reported in the Fifth of November Celebrations (Guy Fawkes) and that “a procession halted at the residence of Henry Broadwood esq in Calverley Park Gardens and gave respected and hearty cheers for Mr and Mrs Broadwood, a compliment that was certainly well deserved…”

The Maidstone Journal of April 27,1867 reported on “Tunbridge Wells Amateur Athletic Sports” and that prizes by Henry Broadwood were distributed by Rev. G. Golding on his behalf.

These are but a few examples used to demonstrate how highly the Broadwood family were thought of in the town, not only from their political activities but general involvement in the community and the many cases where they gave generously of their time and money for the betterment the town and the enjoyment of its residents.

Details about Jerningham House and the Bowling Green House and in fact all things pertaining to Mount Sion can be found in Rogers Farthings book ‘ A history of Mount Sion’. Details about Calverley Park Gardens and the Broadwood Residence can be found in the Royal Civic Society book ‘ The Residential Parks of Tunbridge Wells.

 

THE TUNBRIDGE WELLS AND DISTRICT CANINE SOCIETY

Written By: Edward James Gilbert-Thunder Bay, Ontario, Canada

Date: December 4,2018

INTRODUCTION 

Dogs have always held an important place in our lives and although most of us are quite satisfied to have them as companions there are those who take more interest in breeding them and showing them in competitions and shows held throughout Britain.

In Tunbridge Wells, the Tunbridge Wells And District Canine Society (TWDCS) was established in 1884 and is reported to be one of Uk’s oldest canine societies and since that time have been active in the community in all things related to dogs. There members have entered their dogs regularly in local shows and those held elsewhere. In 1984 the TGWDCS held a special Centenary Show in the town, much to the enjoyment of participants (both owners and their dogs) and spectators, of whom large numbers were in attendance for this historical event.

This is a brief article about the TWDCS and within it I present a few images of local dog shows. Further information about dogs in Tunbridge Wells can be found in my article 'All About Dogs' dated  March 5,2015. On the Vice Presidents pin can be seen the towns logo " Do Well Doubt Not" and the town crest.

THE START OF THE TWDCS   AND EARLY HISTORY

The first show of the TWDCS was announced in the Kent & Sussex Courier in 1884, from which the following was reported.

“The first Tunbridge Wells Dog Show was held in the Calverley Park Gardens, Tunbridge Wells on Thursday and Friday 21st and 22nd August 1884. There were 50 classes of Sporting and Non-Sporting dogs - open to all England, and 6 local classes - for residents within a 10 mile radius of Tunbridge Wells.” Shown opposite is a post card view of the Calverley Grounds but not the dog show itself.

The catalogue for the event showed an entry of over 500 dogs. The main breeds represented were Mastiffs, St. Bernards, Great Danes or Boarhounds, Collies and Sheepdogs, Greyhounds, Pointers, Beagles, Fox Terriers, Spaniels, Setters, Hunt Terriers, Rough Terriers, Black and Tan Terriers, Bulldogs and Pugs. In addition to the breed classes there were also some fun classes.

The show was held over two days. There were promenade concerts and the gardens were decorated with floral displays and arches together with 2500 Chinese lanterns and ornamental lights - all gas of course, as well as balloons and magnesium and coloured lights all donated and supported by local tradesmen. This enabled the displays to be kept open in the evening. There was a grand firework display in the evening on Thursday and the Tunbridge Wells Military Band and Ceylon Band attended on the Friday. Shown above is a photograph of the Ceylon Band taken on another occasion.


Rosettes, medals and cups were presented in various classes by tradesmen and societies in the Kent area and also the Society’s president, the Marquess of Abergavenny who, followed by his nephew and this son, remained Patron until 2000.

Shown opposite is the front of a Tunbridge Wells Canine Society Medal from 1929. The name of the recipient was not  engraved on the back and on the back can only be seen the hallmarks for Birmingham.

Shown above left  is a postcard view of the 1924 SPCA sponsored dog show in Tunbridge Wells. The local SPCA dates back to 19th century and since that time has taken an interest in protecting  the welfare of all animals.

THE SOCIETY TODAY 

Tunbridge Wells & District Canine Society possesses a dedicated team of very experienced dog trainers and holds two successful annual shows for Breed and Agility. The current president of the Society is Peter Mills supported by their Executive Committee. Shown opposite is a modern view.

On their website you can read their Rules and Regulations and their Code of Ethics, both of which guide their membership in this organization.

Tunbridge Wells & District Canine Society Ringcraft Section provides a means where you can polish up on your handling skills. Their classes are held every Tuesday evening from 8pm. They have some very experienced and talented handlers present who can help and advise you with your dog, in the lovely spacious hall which also has the benefit of rubber matting. Tea and coffee are also available in a very relaxed, friendly atmosphere.

SOME INTERESTING DOG SHOW IMAGES

Dog obedience is of course very important and obedience classes have been regularly provided for our canine friends in the town and elsewhere. Shown here are two photographs taken in Tunbridge Wells July 1953 at the Obedience Trials.

 











 

Shown here from a newspaper is a brief article from 1914 with a photograph taken at the annual dog show.









Shown here is a prize card for July 3,1957 as it pertains to an open show by the TWDCS at the Drill Hall on St Johns Road, Tunbridge Wells.

 

 

 

 

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